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Alex Gibney: Going Clear

Discussion in 'Media' started by DeathHamster, Nov 24, 2014.

  1. The Wrong Guy Member

    “Going Clear,” “Deep Web” among Cinema Eye TV finalists | Realscreen

    Documentaries by Alex Gibney, Joe Berlinger, Cynthia Hill and Alex Winter are among the 10 TV projects short-listed for next year’s Cinema Eye Honors.

    The finalists for Outstanding Non-Fiction Filmmaking for Television are the first to be announced for the 9th annual awards, which will be given out during a ceremony in New York City in January.

    Gibney is the first director to be shortlisted twice in the TV category. He is up for Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief (pictured), his investigation into the finances and leadership culture in the Church of Scientology, as well his James Brown bio, Mr. Dynamite: The Rise of James Brown.

    Both films are among five HBO docs on the shortlist.

    Continued here:
    http://realscreen.com/2015/06/16/going-clear-deep-web-among-cinema-eye-tv-finalists/
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  2. anon8109 Member

    John Travolta speaks out against Scientology documentary

    Don't miss a spoof on the Scientology response to the Going Clear documentary at 7:03

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  3. The Wrong Guy Member

    This is from The Sydney Morning Herald today, offering free pairs of tickets for those in Australia:

    Documentary looks inside Scientology

    Now screening at selected cinemas, Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief is an in-depth look at the inner workings of the Church of Scientology. It looks at its roots in the mind of founder L Ron Hubbard and its rise in popularity among A-list Hollywood celebrities and beyond. It profiles eight former members of the church, demonstrates how the church cultivates true believers, details their experiences and what they are willing to do in the name of religion. There are 20 in-season doubles on offer. Details (including postal address) received on competitions@madman.com.au before midnight tonight will enter the draw.

    http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/win-tickets-to-wartime-history-exhibition-20150617-ghq1qv.html
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  4. The Wrong Guy Member

    Here's the moment HBO knew its Scientology doc 'Going Clear' would be a huge hit

    Although the HBO documentary “Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief” is one of the most-watched docs in the history of the network, the head of HBO Documentary Films, Sheila Nevins, didn’t think a scathing look at the Church of Scientology would draw a lot of viewers when director Alex Gibney initially pitched her the idea.

    “I never thought it would be sensational,” Nevins told Business Insider.

    Before Gibney went to her, Nevins said she had never considered doing a film on the religion. She gave the go-ahead because she had confidence that the Oscar-winning Gibney ("Taxi to the Dark Side," 2007) could pull off a great adaptation of best-selling author Lawrence Wright’s book on the church, “Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief.

    Nevins remembers the exact moment when she realized “Going Clear” was going to be a huge hit. “When I saw my name in a full page ad in The New York Times, I knew,” she said. “Docs don’t get full page ads, and when they do, they do really well.”

    Nevins is referring to the ad that Scientology ran in The Times weeks before the film had its world premiere at the Sundance Film Festival in January.

    <snipped>

    “I thought, ‘They really don’t want us to do it,’” said Nevins. “All the reason more to do it.”

    <snipped>

    Thinking back on the whole ordeal, Nevins still can’t believe the church was so aggressive in trying to bash “Going Clear.”

    “Scientology did their own commercial for us,” she said. “Going Clear” had its premiere airing on HBO in March and became the second most-watched documentary on the network in the past decade.

    http://finance.yahoo.com/news/heres-moment-hbo-knew-scientology-145000442.html
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  5. RightOn Member

    "Nevins remembers the exact moment when she realized “Going Clear” was going to be a huge hit. “When I saw my name in a full page ad in The New York Times, I knew,” she said. “Docs don’t get full page ads, and when they do, they do really well.”"

    BWAH HA HA!
    So whose idea was it to run that ad again? Hmmmm?
    Thank you SO much Davey! Keep 'em coming!
    Thanks for the extra boost!
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  6. The Wrong Guy Member

    Going Clear review: Celebrity and Scientology, the inside story

    By Paul Byrnes, The Sydney Morning Herald

    First paragraph:

    What kind of church decides to break up your marriage, snoop on you with private detectives and turn your kids against you? All of that happened to Nicole Kidman during her marriage to Scientology's poster-boy, Tom Cruise, according to Alex Gibney's fascinating and trenchant documentary.

    Last paragraph:

    Even if half of Gibney's film was to be considered tainted, the work of people who have scores to settle, it would be hard to dismiss. They can't all be liars. Instead, it plays as a sober investigation of something that beggars understanding – a billion-dollar cult that continues to attract the vulnerable, especially the rich and famous ones like Cruise and John Travolta, neither of whom comes out of this looking good.

    http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment...ntology-the-inside-story-20150617-ghpv0c.html
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  7. RightOn Member

    great! ^^^^^
    "They can't all be liars"

    Yup!
    and we have a big 'ol list of all who have spoken out! ;)
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  8. anon8109 Member

    Bryan Seymour, Nick Xenophon and Paul Schofield at the Australian Premiere of Going Clear at the Dendy Cinema in Newtown. Sydney, Australia.

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  9. anon8109 Member

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  10. Anonymous Member

    A couple of reports from the UK:

    Scientology documentary to get UK release

    Friday 19 Jun 2015

    Alex Gibney's Scientology documentary Going Clear is to get a UK release despite legal pressure from the Church of Scientology on film companies not to allow screenings in their cinemas.

    Screen Daily reports that UK lawyers acting for the church have contacted at least one company which is involved in the release of Going Clear and warned of potential copyright infringement, should the film be screened in the UK.

    However, distributors and exhibitors will go ahead with their plans to show the film in 10 to 15 UK cinemas from June 26.

    Screen Daily also says marketing plans for the film have been changed because of the controversy surrounding the release.

    Sky Atlantic, which owns theatrical rights to the film, has reportedly postponed the film’s UK television broadcast until September, after concerns that the film could contravene libel laws in Northern Ireland.

    (More at the link)

    http://www.rte.ie/ten/news/2015/0619/709237-scientology-documentary-to-get-uk-release-despite/

    Scientology doc to get UK release despite pressure

    19 June, 2015 | By Andreas Wiseman

    Companies involved in the UK theatrical release of Alex Gibney’s controversial Scientology documentary Going Clear have come under pressure from the Church of Scientology not to release the film.

    Screen understands that UK lawyers acting for the organisation have contacted at least one company and individual involved in the film’s theatrical release warning of potential copyright infringement should the film be screened in the UK.

    Despite that, distributors and exhibitors – who asked not to be named - are pressing ahead with plans to show the film, which has been slightly reversioned for the UK to include captions relating to potentially sensitive material.

    Broadcaster Sky Atlantic owns theatrical rights to the film and has engaged a third party distributor to service the June 26th release, which is due to reach between 10-15 UK venues.

    However, marketing plans for the film have been curtailed due to the controversy surrounding the release.

    Sky Atlantic - in a virtual repeat of events two years ago, when UK publishers abandoned publication of the book on which the expose documentary is based - reportedly postponed the film’s UK broadcast transmission after concerns that the film could contravene libel laws in Northern Ireland.

    (More at the link)

    http://www.screendaily.com/news/dis...t-uk-release-despite-pressure/5089580.article
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  11. The Wrong Guy Member

    Movie reviews: Going Clear, The Emperor's New Clothes

    By John McDonald, Australian Financial Review, June 20, 2015

    Quote:

    After last week's interview with Alex Gibney in AFR Weekend, I received my obligatory email from Vicki Dunstan, President of the Australian chapter of the Church of Scientology, warning me about the filmmaker's one-sided approach in Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief.

    Gibney makes "outrageous claims", peddles "blatant falsehoods", and refuses to consider the documentation the Church presents in its own defence.

    Dunstan would like everyone to check out the Church's response to Gibney on freedommag.org. This is one thing she and her antagonist have in common, as Gibney is also encouraging his audience to visit that website.

    It's a perfect example of the way the Church operates: a relentless attack on the director and every ex-Scientologist interviewed for the film. The attacks are personal and vitriolic. There is no trace of the balance the Scientologists find lacking in Gibney's approach.

    They accuse Gibney of being a propagandist but their response is the most shameless propaganda. The only way such apparent hypocrisy can be flaunted in public is if one has an unshakeable self-belief. The other options would be sheer stupidity, or the cynical view that most people will believe anything, but for the sake of argument I'll stick with "self-belief".

    Gibney argues that the Scientology website is speaking to those who are already on-side. Because the Church leadership views itself as infallible any criticism must necessarily be unjustified. It's a position even the Pope might hesitate to take up nowadays, but it helps simplify the complexities of life.

    It also raises a crucial question for those of us who have never understood the appeal of Scientology: "Why do apparently normal, intelligent people feel the need to immerse themselves in an organisation that tells you what to think, what to believe, and how to live your life?"

    It's hardly a new phenomenon, in fact it may be a basic human need. Scientology doesn't call itself a religion solely for tax purposes; it needs the kudos and credibility of that title.


    Gibney explains the hold Scientology exercises on its members by dwelling on a phrase coined by author, Lawrence Wright – "the prison of belief". Those who get hooked on Scientology are seekers who feel dissatisfied by their relationships, their level of achievement, the superficiality of everyday life. The Church presents itself as a therapeutic experience that helps one achieve clarity. The deeper the subject goes, the higher the level reached on the recurrent personality tests, the more satisfying and addictive the process.

    Locked into a sci-fi novel

    It is only at a comparatively late stage that one learns the Creation story about Xenu and the Thetans (it sounds like a rock band!), and by then it's too late to have doubts. You have entered the prison of belief. The hermetic nature of the Church means that your family and friends are also likely to be members, while every contrary influence is "disconnected" from your life.

    For many members, the Church becomes the very bedrock of their being. Whole generations of children have grown up under its aegis, knowing no other existence. Nevertheless it still feels hard to believe anyone would willingly submit to doctrines dreamed up by pulp science fiction writer L. Ron Hubbard as a get-rich-quick-scheme that he eventually came to take seriously – along with his own prophetic status.

    Gibney gives us all the necessary background on Scientology, including some startling footage of Hubbard wearing make-up, looking – and acting – like an ageing drag queen. Gibney takes us through the history of the movement, its tenets and methods, not to mention its epic battle with the United States tax department. That struggle was finally resolved in favour of the Scientologists after it bombarded the Internal Revenue Service with vexatious lawsuits until it agreed to allow the Church to be classified as a religion – and therefore tax free.

    Scientology is also a bona fide religion in Australia, but not in a country such as Germany, where it is viewed as a cult.

    The strength of this documentary is that it doesn't dwell too long on the mumbo-jumbo of Scientology. Gibney interviews eight people, long-term members of the Church, who give harrowing accounts of their experiences. Some of these, such as Marty Rathbun and Mike Rinder, were high officials who obviously enjoyed the power and prestige associated with their jobs. They may be repentant now, but for decades they acted as True Believers.

    Were they simply opportunists? Gibney doesn't judge them, he is more interested in the information they can provide.

    The most damning parts of the film are the clips made by the Church itself, including an interview with celebrity Scientologist, Tom Cruise, in which the actor seems positively deranged. Even more alarming is the footage of Scientology's El Supremo, David Miscavige, speaking to his followers from a platform that resembles a cross between the Nuremberg rallies and the Academy Awards.

    Miscavige, who gives the straight arm salute beloved of all Great Leaders, has the kind of haircut last seen in a pop video by Devo – a coif so plastic it looks like a comedy prop.

    The biggest problem for the Church is that Going Clear is almost hypnotically fascinating. It is like watching a great mystery story unfold. The Church can complain that it is all lies and try and to prevent followers from tuning in, but despite its billions and its army of disciples, Scientology is particularly vulnerable to the free flow of information and opinion.

    In the age of the internet and social media that flow is uncontrollable. Watch the film, check out the Scientology website, and draw your own conclusions.

    Source:
    http://www.afr.com/lifestyle/arts-a...lear-the-emperors-new-clothes-20150619-ghpfu2
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  12. The Wrong Guy Member

    New Scientology Film Shows 'How The Corrupt Use Blind Faith Of Followers Against Them'

    Going Clear plays as both absurdist comedy and unsettling thriller.

    By Anthony Carew, The Music, Australia

    With all due respect to Evangelical Christianity and Free Market Fundamentalism, there’s no religion as All-American as Scientology. Built on a buzzwordy rhetoric equal parts marketing cant and self-help seminar, it’s a can-do cult geared towards the aspirational and self-obsessed, using the starry allure of Hollywood celebrity as both solicitation and platform; its vision of global ambition every film in which Tom Cruise rides a motorcycle.

    Sometimes, Scientology seems like a parody of organised religion: a bizarre collection of creation tales the basis for an apparatus of specious promises, sweet exploitation, and indentured servitude. As its ultra-affluent celebrity elite live the sweet life in gilded excess, its unseen slave-labour underclass toils in silent, beaten-down anonymity; making Scientology both parody of organised religion and symbol of American society itself.

    A documentary exposé on Scientology has been a long-time coming, not least of all because the aggressively-litigious, surveillance-gathering, media-threatening practices of the organisation function as a form of fear-mongering, for both those behind and in front of the camera. But, over time, growing ranks of whistleblowers and dissident dropouts have gone public with their stories of Scientologist life, breaking the codes of secrecy, silencing, and shame. And many of them — filmmaker Paul Haggis, former second-in-command Mark Rathburn, John Travolta’s ex-personal-runner Spanky Taylor — appear in Going Clear: Scientology And The Prison Of Belief, the definitive cinematic chronicle of the rise and fall of Hollywood’s favourite cult.

    Continued here:
    http://themusic.com.au/opinion/film...pt-use-blind-faith-of-followers-against-them/
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  13. https://twitter.com/alexgibneyfilm/status/611914808359809024

    GibneyUK.PNG
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  14. Sekee Member


    I’m confused, how can something be copyright in the UK but not anywhere else?
  15. Digital Spy: The Church of Scientology is attempting to stop documentary Going Clear’s UK release

    http://www.digitalspy.co.uk/movies/...stop-documentary-going-clears-uk-release.html

    * * * * * BEGIN EXCERPT * * * * * *

    Screen reports that UK lawyers for the Church are in touch with at least one company and an individual involved in the movie's release, warning of potential copyright infringement if the film is shown in the UK.

    But the approach doesn't appear to have put off the UK distributors, who are slightly revising some scenes with captions in the UK version "relating to potentially sensitive material".

    * * * * * END EXCERPT * * * * *
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  16. Incredulicide Member

    5 minutes 50 seconds into this Bryan Seymour mentions that he's also writing a book about his encounters with Scientology :cool:
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  17. RightOn Member

    Bravo to Paul, Nick and Bryan
    and double Bravo to Bryan for writing a book. I am anxious to read that one!
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  18. RightOn Member

    Just the fact that the cult is trying to stop the UK release is ONCE AGAIN proof of their cult behavior that is portrayed in the film.
    Thank you ONCE AGAIN COS for making this film more controversial, and making everyone want to see what all the hub hub is about and why the COS hired all those lawyers!
    BWHA HA HA
    You fools never learn!
    And thank Xenu for that!
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  19. Going Clear uses a lot of clips for which Gibney couldn't get formal authorization to use. However, Fair Use doctrine in the US means that he knew he was safe to use them anyway, at least for a US release.

    UK copyright law may be different enough that the CoS can at least get it into a courtroom, which if it delays the film they will count as a victory.
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  20. The Wrong Guy Member

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  21. JohnnyRUClear Member



    Z457n4f.jpg
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  22. Random guy Member


    An intelligent discussion on faux news, who would have thought it?!
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  23. The Wrong Guy Member

    Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief, film review: Chilling inside views on a secretive church

    By Geoffrey Macnab, The Independent

    Last two paragraphs:

    Anyone outside the Church who criticises or attacks it, whether journalists or tax officers or former Scientologists, is seemingly "fair game" for harassment and attack. The implicit charge against celebrities such as Cruise and Travolta is that they turn a blind eye to the bad behaviour around them. Having famously faced down the IRS, the Church is not liable for taxes. According to the documentary, it is now a "kind of tax-free shell company" worth over $3bn.

    Gibney is too subtle and diligent a film-maker to indulge in a one-sided hatchet-job. The tone of Going Clear is inquisitive, not sensationalist. The documentary is painstakingly researched. If its accusations are "entirely false" (as the Church claims), it is surprising that quite so many former members continue to make them.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-e...ide-views-on-a-secretive-church-10346330.html
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  24. The Wrong Guy Member

    Going Clear — Scientology And The Prison Of Belief film review: brave documentary features some terrifying moments

    By Charlotte O'Sullivan, London Evening Standard

    Last two paragraphs:

    Throughout the film we’re informed that the Scientologists refute such claims. Yet the most damning words tumble from the lips of true believers. Footage of top man David Miscavige is truly terrifying. Saucer-eyed and maniacally dapper, he presides over glitzy rallies like a man possessed.

    Miscavige has faced down the FBI and the IRS; he’s ensured that Scientology’s coffers have never been more full. That said, he hasn’t been able to stop this film getting a release (in London it’s showing at six sites). It was the hot ticket at Sundance, so expect big queues. It’s entertaining, as well as educational, to see an emperor laid bare.

    http://www.standard.co.uk/goingout/...eatures-some-terrifying-moments-10348270.html
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  25. The Wrong Guy Member

    Alex Gibney on Scientology and his documentary Going Clear | The Saturday Paper, Australia

    Excerpt:

    Gibney’s film is as measured as it’s possible to be but that hasn’t stopped attacks on him – with the church claiming that the people he spoke to had their own agendas. The claim tickles him.

    “ ‘So what if they did?’ would be my point of view,” he says, laughing. “I don’t present them in the film as objective sources. The Church of Scientology always says, ‘Well, how can you make a film about the church and only put these people in?’ I have two answers to that. One is, ‘Who says that I was making a film about the Church of Scientology? I was making a film maybe about these people.’ And second of all, I did ask people from the church to appear – and they declined. They always decline! That’s the truth.”

    More seriously he notes that other films about Scientology have started from a premise of “look at those fucking nut jobs and aren’t they weird”. He focused instead on the church’s appeal, the self-help it offers in its early stages – and then examined how that can turn sour. “I wanted to talk to people who I thought were intelligent and discerning about how they got in, how they got lost, how they got out, that seemed to me more intriguing. And ultimately more meaningful.”

    http://www.thesaturdaypaper.com.au/...nd-his-documentary-going-clear/14353272002040
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  26. The Wrong Guy Member

    This thread was the best one that I could find to share this in:

    Going Clear Over And Over | Sec Check

    [IMG]

    Scientologist and Chiropractor Ben Horning has a practice in Laguna Hills, California. In the photo above he displays his certificate for attesting to Clear this week at the South Coast Mission in Lake Forest, California, a few miles from his office. In the photo below, he displays his Clear certificate from July, 2014. We asked one of our correspondents why he might attest to Clear twice in less than a year.

    The only thing I can think is that he hadn’t done his 200 hours of Survival Rundown or super duper 100% Standard DM tech Purification Rundown so he had to redo those and then re-attested. Tons of money and double the stats all round.

    [IMG]

    Source:
    https://seccheck.wordpress.com/2015/06/27/going-clear-over-and-over/
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  27. Scientology documentary Going Clear will not be shown in East Grinstead.

    East Grinstead Online: Scientology documentary will not be shown in East Grinstead
    http://bluebelldigital.co.uk/eastgr...umentary-will-not-be-shown-in-east-grinstead/

    * * * * * BEGIN EXCERPT * * * * *

    But a spokesman for Scott cinemas said the film will not be shown in East Grinstead:

    “I’ve spoken to my Booking Manager and unfortunately due to a contractual issue between the film’s distributor and payments that they would have to pay in order to play this film, we’re therefore unable to play this film, sorry.”

    It is currently at the following London/Brighton cinemas:

    London – Curzon Mayfair

    London – DocHouse

    London – Greenwich Picturehouse

    London – Hackney Picturehouse

    London – Picturehouse Central

    London – Ritzy Picturehouse

    London – Stratford Picturehouse

    Brighton – Dukes at Komedia

    From 3 July

    London East Dulwich Picturehouse

    From 10 July

    London – Lexi Cinema

    London – Shortwave Cinema

    * * * * * END EXCERPT * * * * *Scientology documentary Going Clear will not be shown in East Grinstead.

    East Grinstead Online: Scientology documentary will not be shown in East Grinstead
    http://bluebelldigital.co.uk/eastgr...umentary-will-not-be-shown-in-east-grinstead/

    * * * * * BEGIN EXCERPT * * * * *

    But a spokesman for Scott cinemas said the film will not be shown in East Grinstead:

    “I’ve spoken to my Booking Manager and unfortunately due to a contractual issue between the film’s distributor and payments that they would have to pay in order to play this film, we’re therefore unable to play this film, sorry.”

    It is currently at the following London/Brighton cinemas:

    London – Curzon Mayfair

    London – DocHouse

    London – Greenwich Picturehouse

    London – Hackney Picturehouse

    London – Picturehouse Central

    London – Ritzy Picturehouse

    London – Stratford Picturehouse

    Brighton – Dukes at Komedia

    From 3 July

    London East Dulwich Picturehouse

    From 10 July

    London – Lexi Cinema

    London – Shortwave Cinema

    * * * * * END EXCERPT * * * * *
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  28. The Australian: Scientologists pressured Sydney Film Festival to ban film

    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/art...ival-to-ban-film/story-e6frg8pf-1227422386462

    * * * * * BEGIN EXCERPT * * * * *

    The Sydney Film Festival almost buckled to pressure from the Church of Scientology to ban screenings of the documentary about the contentious religion, Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief. The church’s Australian legal representative, Kennedys, sent legal threats to the SFF and the film’s distributor, Madman, claiming the film was “highly defamatory”, particularly its allegations a leader of the church placed an illegal wiretap on Nicole Kidman, the then-wife of Tom Cruise. Reel Time understands the SFF board opted to pull the film from its screening at the festival before the late intervention of artistic director Nashen Moodley. Madman continued with its commercial release. Unlike many enterprises, the church can sue for defamation in Australia because it is a “not for profit” corporation. The church’s “not for profit” status is a point of contention in the film, and is likely to be an emerging issue for the church in the US and Australia if any legal action arises. CS Australia president Vicki Dunstan says “none of the allegations in Going Clear relates to the church in Australia” and “The Church of Scientology International (CSI) has already responded to the baseless allegations” the film raised on its website (
    Code:
    www.freedommag.org
    ). She says the church will not “publicly discuss” its legal rights. The legal threats are part of a campaign against Alex Gibney’s film by the church. “The church is passionate about both freedom of speech and the free exercise of religion,” Dunstan says. “HBO and the producer ignored the church and the result is a ridiculous fairytale by a handful of bitter individuals with their own personal agendas.” The legal action is also believed to claim the film will breach the television codes of practice, when subsequently broadcast on subscription television (Foxtel), by perpetuating “intense dislike, serious contempt or severe ridicule” against a group on the grounds of religion. It is believed the film has been turned down for screening by Qantas too. Qantas ambassador and high-profile Scientologist John Travolta is featured in the film. Sydney Film Festival chief executive Leigh Small and Madman Entertainment did not comment.

    * * * * * END EXCERPT * * * * *
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  29. RightOn Member

    "passionate about freedom of speech"
    Yet the COS is fighting for it not to air!

    "handful of bitter individuals"
    Gibney was never a church member and I have a list of over 2600 people who say otherwise.

    BWA HA HA
    your tears are delicious Dunstan!
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  30. Incredulicide Member

    fify :)
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  31. Random guy Member

  32. The Wrong Guy Member

    Scientology Documentary 'Going Clear's' International Release Threatened by Church

    Alex Gibney's documentary opened in several international countries in recent weeks against backlash from the Church of Scientology.

    By Austin Siegemund-Broka, The Hollywood Reporter, July 3, 2015

    Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief is going international, but not without challenges from the Church of Scientology, which has succeeded in postponing its broadcast in the United Kingdom.

    The damning documentary on the Church, which premiered in the United States on HBO in March, did open theatrically in several international markets during the last week. It has done respectable box office numbers in each but is facing threats of lawsuits from the Church, director Alex Gibney tells The Hollywood Reporter.

    "Every step of the way, every distributor, every festival has received multiple threatening letters from the Church of Scientology. Some have come very close to buckling," says Gibney.

    In the U.K., broadcaster Sky halted plans to air the documentary in April due to concerns with Northern Ireland's libel law, which is more restrictive than Britain's 2013 Defamation Act. "Ireland has pretty bad laws if you're thinking about a free press," says Gibney.

    Sky can't show different Sky Atlantic signals in different regions for technological reasons, so the Church's threats of litigation under Irish law (reported by The Guardian's Observer) caused the company to postpone the entire U.K. airing. Sky called the decision a delay rather than a cancellation but doesn't have a confirmed air date yet, said a spokeswoman.

    However, a theatrical distributor, deliberately keeping a low profile, released the film in 18 theaters in England and Scotland on June 26 and has scheduled several more theaters into July. The documentary earned $24,950 in its first weekend and by the Friday exceeded $47,620.

    In Italy, the film was released in theaters on June 25 via Lucky Red, and it’s earned more than $20,000, and on May 8, it opened in Canada via The Archive, and it's surpassed $100,000 (in addition to VOD earnings). The Archive president Randy Manis says his company has not directly received threats from the Church of Scientology, though libel law in Canada is less liberal than in the United States and is similar to that of Northern Ireland.

    "We've not really tried to play up any kind of controversy. We're just presenting a film by a talented filmmaker. We're letting people decide for themselves," says Manis.

    For its part, Scientology has called the doc‎ “one-sided, bigoted propaganda built on falsehoods.” The Hollywood Reporter has reached out to the Church for further comment

    While it's now two months from its opening, the documentary will continue expanding to other Canadian screens, with some new theaters requesting it and previous venues requesting it to return, says Manis. “I'm hoping it'll still be in theaters when Mission: Impossible starts hitting those markets," says Gibney, noting that franchise’s lead Tom Cruise is one of the greatest generators of interest in Scientology worldwide.

    Likewise, he says Cruise's relationship with Australian native Nicole Kidman has created interest in Scientology in Australia, where the film screened at the Sydney Film Festival in June. "The Sydney Film Festival got a lot of threatening letters, and they were taking them very seriously," says Gibney. "I was delighted with the way the Australians handled it."

    He recalls an audience member standing up in the middle of one festival event: "He said, 'I want you to be aware that the head of the Australian Church of Scientology is here today,' and pointed the guy out. I asked him if he would like to comment, and he declined and promptly left the room. They don't like to come out in public, because there are often ex-Scientologists there who know how things really work."

    The film's Australian theatrical release, via Madman, began on June 18 via Madman, grossing $57,307 on 14 screens its opening weekend and $80,887 its first week. The distributor received letters from the Church's lawyers threatening defamation lawsuits.

    The film, represented by sales agent Content, has sold worldwide, but presently, it is set only for non-theatrical release in most major markets, including France, Germany and Japan. Interest in Scientology is higher in certain countries, like in France, where the Church was convicted of fraud in 2009 in a case the French media speculated could lead to the organization's dissolution.

    Gibney says the film nevertheless will resonate in countries less familiar with Scientology.

    "It's about Scientology but it’s also about religion, and I think a lot of countries that are deeply religious will appreciate the film," he says. "It's about how religion can use its sacred character to condone or cover up abuses, and I think that’s of great interest to a lot of people."

    Source:
    http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/scientology-documentary-going-clears-international-806731
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  33. Random guy Member

    Man, Gibney got good milage pout of this film!
    • Like Like x 2
  34. anon8109 Member

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  35. JohnnyRUClear Member

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  36. GibbousWaxing Member

    Cuz Fair Game is, like, a sacrament, y'know.

    Or it would be if there was such a thing. Which there isn't anymore. Not that there ever was. BIGOT!
    • Like Like x 2
  37. RightOn Member

    Your're all haters!
    AGAIN…. Viscous Duncecap says:
    "The church is passionate about both freedom of speech and the free exercise of religion,” Dunstan says.
    Unless you are talking about THEM that is.
    • Like Like x 3
  38. The Wrong Guy Member

    Here's another review from Australia:

    Carefully burning Scientology

    By Tim Kroenert, Eureka Street

    If you're going to apply a blowtorch to an institution as wealthy, as litigious and as notoriously aggressive in the face of criticism as the Church of Scientology, you might best be advised to first apply a magnifying glass. There is no doubt that a power of research underpins veteran American documentarian Alex Gibney's Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief. The film plays out like a gripping Hollywood drama, but with the cogency of an academic paper.

    Continued here, with open comments:
    http://www.eurekastreet.com.au/article.aspx?aeid=45103
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  39. The Wrong Guy Member

    The dark side of Scientology | New Zealand Herald

    Alex Gibney’s documentary on Scientology reveals the dark side of the celebrity sanctioned religion. The director talks to Peter Calder

    Excerpt:

    "Hubbard, as a writer, understood the power of an actor to carry a good story. In America in particular, but probably worldwide, the most compelling popular religion is celebrity and Hubbard understood that very well. What the stars give Scientology is like the Good Housekeeping seal of approval."

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/entertainment/news/article.cfm?c_id=1501119&objectid=11479320
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