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Alleged source: Aaron Swartz

Discussion in 'Freedom of Expression' started by Anonymous, Jan 14, 2013.

  1. Anonymous Member

    IMHO these links should be spread around.
  2. Anonymous Member

    2013-0090.pdf Aaron Swartz: Information Society Theories January 19, 2013 (2.4MB)
    Theories of the
    Information Society
    Third edition
    Frank Webster



    Contents
    Acknowledgements viii
    1 Introduction 1
    2 What is an information society? 8
    3 Post-industrial society: Daniel Bell 32
    4 Regulation School theory 60
    5 Network society: Manuel Castells 98
    6 Information and the market: Herbert Schiller 124
    7 Information and democracy: Jürgen Habermas 161
    8 Information, reflexivity and surveillance: Anthony Giddens 203
    9 Information and postmodernity 228
    10 The information society? 263
  3. Anonymous Member

    Contents
    selected artists xiii
    selected technologies xvii
    series foreword xix
    foreword by joel slayton xxi
    preface xxiii
    1 Introduction, Methodology, Definitions, and Theoretical Overview 1
    1.1 art and science as cultural acts 2
    A Quiz 4
    Revisiting the Relationship of Art and Techno-Scientific Research 5
    Organization of the Book 7
    The Deficiency of Categorization 8
    What Areas of Technological Art Are Included? Which Are Not? 9
    Definitions and Theoretical Reflections 11
    Similarities and Differences between Science and Art 18
    Critical Theory and Problematic Issues in the Integration of Art and
    Techno-Scientific Research 20
    Artists’ Stances in Integrating Research 25
    Summary: The End of Timelessness? 30
    1.2 elaboration on the approach of art as research 34
    Can the Arts Offer Alternatives in Setting Research Agendas, Interpreting
    Results, and Communicating Findings? 35
    What Is a Viable Role for Artists in Research Settings? What Can Researchers
    Contribute to Art and What Can Artists Contribute to Research? What Can
    High-Tech Companies Gain from Artists Being Involved? 36
    Art Characteristics Useful for Research 38
    Preparing Artists for Research 39
    TheRevisiting the Relationship of Art and Techno-Scientific Research 5
    Organization of the Book 7
    The Deficiency of Categorization 8
    What Areas of Technological Art Are Included? Which Are Not? 9
    Definitions and Theoretical Reflections 11
    Similarities and Differences between Science and Art 18
    Critical Theory and Problematic Issues in the Integration of Art and
    Techno-Scientific Research 20
    Artists’ Stances in Integrating Research 25
    Summary: The End of Timelessness? 30
    1.2 elaboration on the approach of art as research 34
    Can the Arts Offer Alternatives in Setting Research Agendas, Interpreting
    Results, and Communicating Findings? 35
    What Is a Viable Role for Artists in Research Settings? What Can Researchers
    Contribute to Art and What Can Artists Contribute to Research? What Can
    High-Tech Companies Gain from Artists Being Involved
    The Integration of Research and Art 40
    Art and Science/Technology Collaborations 41
    Future Possibilities 48

    2 Biology: Microbiology, Animals and Plants, Ecology, and Medicine and
    the Body 53
    2.1 biology: research agendas and theoretical overview 54
    Introduction 55
    Research Agendas in Biology and Medicine 56
    Areas of Cultural Significance in Biological Research 59
    Theoretical Perspectives on Biology and the Body 72
    Rethinking the Body and Medicine 77
    Searching for Aesthetic Form in Art and Science 84
    How Are Biology-Based Theory and Research Important to the Arts? 88
    2.2 artists working with microbiology 94
    Introduction: Microbiology and Genetics as Artistic Interest 95
    Manipulations and Investigations of the Microworld 96
    Creating Forms and Visualizations Based on Its Structures, Including the New
    Iconography of Gene Mapping 101
    Reflections on the Processes of Genetic Science and Its Social Implications 105
    Summary: Micro Steps 108
    2.3 plants and animals 110
    Introduction 111
    Invertebrates 112
    Arthropods: Insects and Spiders 116
    Plants 118
    Vertebrates 120
    Acoustic Ecology 123
    Summary 126
    2.4 ecological art 128
    Ecology: Organic Life as a System 129
    Questions Raised by Artistic Interest in Ecology 130
    Historical Examples of Artistic Work 131
    Contemporary Artistic Work with Ecological Concepts
    Summary: Linking Science and Art in Action 146
    2.5 body and medicine 148
    Introduction: Bodies, Technology, and Theory 149
    Extropian and Post-Human Approaches 154
    Contents
    Artists’ Experiments with Technological Stimulation 157
    Artists’ Experiments with Smell 169
    Artists’ Experiments with Surgery 170
    Experiments with Tissue Culture 174
    Body Modification 174
    Brain Processes, Heartbeats, Breath, Biosensors, and Psychology 180
    The Psychological Processes of Perception, Cognition, Appreciation, and Creativity 189
    Body Imaging 189
    Medicine, Hospitals, Bodily Fluids, and Death 193
    Summary: Dissecting the Body 198

    3 Physics, Nonlinear Systems, Nanotechnology, Materials Science,
    Geology, Astronomy, Space Science, Global Positioning System, and
    Cosmology 201
    3.1 physical science research agendas and theoretical reflections 202
    Introduction: Questions about the Biggest and Smallest of Things 203
    Survey of Research Fields and Agendas 204
    Nonlinear Systems, Chaos, and Complexity 207
    Astronomy, Cosmology, and Space Science 209
    Epistemology—How Do We Know What We Know? 211
    Potentially Important Emergent Technologies 213
    Summary: Artist Explorations of Physical Science Research and Concepts 221
    3.2 atomic physics, nanotechnology, and nuclear science 222
    Atomic Physics 223
    Viewing and Manipulating the Atomic World—Nanotechnology 226
    Nuclear Science 230
    Summary: Difficulties of Working at the Atomic Level 233
    3.3 materials and natural phenomena: nonlinear dynamic systems,
    water, weather, solar energy, geology, and mechanical
    motion 234
    Nonlinear Systems 235
    Natural Phenomena—Oceans, Water, and Moving Liquid 239
    Natural Phenomena—Erosion and Geological Action 241
    Natural Phenomena—The Sky, Winds, and Weather 244
    Solar Art 246
    Mechanics—Oscillation and Pendulum Action 251
    Fire, Heat,
    Summary: The Hopes 279
    3.4 space 260
    Artistic Interest in Space 261
    Views from Space 263
    Art Viewed from Earth 265
    Art Executed in Space and Weightlessness 268
    Painting and Photography Based on Space Exploration 271
    Conceptual and Electronic Works 271
    Search for Extra Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) 275
    Art Critiques of Space Research 278
    Summary: The Hopes 279
    3.5 global positioning system (gps) 282
    Possibilities and Dangers 283
    Artistic Experimentation with GPS 283
    Summary: Unexpected Implications 292

    4 Algorithms, Mathematics, Fractals, Genetic Art, and Artificial Life 295
    4.1 research agendas in mathematics and artificial life 296
    Why Is Mathematics Part of a Book on Science, Technology, and Art? 297
    A Review of Research Agendas in Mathematics 298
    Artificial Life 302
    Theoretical Perspectives on A-Life 305
    Summary 311
    4.2 algorithmic art, art and mathematics, and fractals 312
    Algorithmic Art 313
    Art and Mathematics 320
    Fractals 330
    Promise and Problems in Art and Mathematics and Algorithmic Art 333
    Literacy—Audience Background 334
    Understanding Systems 336
    Abstraction and Cultural Theory 337
    4.3 artificial life and genetic art 340
    A-Life Sculpture and Autonomous Agents 341
    Genetic, Evolutionary, and Organic Art 351

    5 Kinetics, Sound Installations, and Robots 367
    5.1 robotics and kinetics 368
    Introduction: Robots—Creatures of Art and Science 369
    An Overview of Scientific and Technological Research Agendas 371
    Contents
    viii
    Examples of Conceptual Challenges and Approaches 374
    Robots and Popular Culture 382
    Summary: Robot Hopes, Fears, and Realities 383
    5.2 conceptual kinetics and electronics 386
    Artistic Research 387
    Kinetic Art Precursors 388
    Kinetics and Light Sculpture 389
    Conceptual Kinetics 392
    Summary: More Than Robotics 405
    5.3 kinetic instruments, sound sculpture, and industrial music 406
    A Brief Theoretical Overture 407
    Experiments in Sound Installation 409
    Summary: Research as Art 422
    5.4 robots 424
    Robotic Theater and Robotic Dance 425
    Autonomy 427
    Extreme Performance, Destruction, Mayhem, and Control 432
    Social Metaphors 440
    Extending Robot Motion and Interfaces 446
    Robot Architecture 451
    Summary: Kinetics and Robots—Hybrids of Art and Science 454
    6 Telecommunications 457
    6.1 telecommunications research agendas and theoretical
    reflections 458
    Introduction: Overcoming Distance 459
    Telecommunications Research and Development 460
    Research Trends in Telepresence 469
    The Meaning of the Telecommunications ‘‘Revolution’’ 473
    The Exploration of New Possibilities 481
    Summary: Telecommunications—The Grand Cyber Debate 484
    6.2 telephone, radio, and net.radio 486
    A Brief History of Telematic Art 487
    Theoretical Perspectives on Telephone Art 488
    Examples of Telephone-Based Art 490
    Radio, Television, and Wireless 497
    Radio-Based Art and Theater Installations 503
    Art Radio 504
    Contents
    ix
    The Migration to Net.Radio 507
    Summary: Dangers and Opportunities in Convergence 511
    6.3 teleconferencing, videoconferencing, satellites, the internet, and
    telepresence 514
    Teleconferencing, Videoconferencing, Satellites, and Internet Collaboration 515
    Telepresence Definitions 526
    Artists Exploring Telepresence 528
    Visualizing Net Activity 549
    Parapsychological Communication 554
    Summary: Being There 556
    6.4 web art 558
    Critical Perspectives on Web Art 561
    Archive and Information Sites 564
    Projects to Accumulate Web-Viewer Opinions 572
    Genetic Art Using Web-Visitor Voting 573
    Recomposing Web Resources 576
    Collaborative Environments and Person-to-Person Communication 579
    The Development of New Capabilities 585
    Reflections about the Net 589
    Arrangements That Use Readings of the Physical World to Affect the Web 596
    Cool Sites 599
    Summary: The Web as an Art Arena 600
    7 Digital Information Systems/Computers 603
    7.1 research agendas and theoretical overview 604
    Introduction: The Computer Revolution 605
    Diverse Histories of Technological Imagination 605
    Research Agendas 607
    Theoretical Reflections on the Digital Culture and Art 630
    Summary: Debate in the Art Community—Possibilities of an Enhanced Future 657
    7.2 computer media 664
    Introduction: Extensions of Photography, Cinema, Video, and Literature 665
    Deconstructive and Feminist Critiques of Cultural Trends 666
    Extending Poetic and Expressive Capabilities 671
    Art Games 676
    Multi-Person Events 679
    Video Installation 680
    Interactive Documentary 685
    Hyperfiction 688
    Summary: Computer Media—The Next Stages of Cinema and Television? 689
    7.3 virtual reality 692
    Introduction: Artists as Architects of Virtual Reality 693
    Unorthodox Spaces and Characters 694
    The Virtual Reality World as Metaphor 705
    Alternative Objects and Creatures 709
    Relationships between the Physical and the Virtual 712
    Information Visualization 717
    Distributed Virtual Reality 721
    Virtual Reality, Music, and Theater 722
    Research and Commercial Virtual Reality Environments 725
    Summary 726
    7.4 motion, gesture, touch, gaze, manipulation, and activated
    objects 728
    Introduction: Reworking the Interface 729
    Motion 730
    Gesture 745
    Touch and Tactility 749
    Gaze 755
    Face Recognition 758
    Complex Actions—Balance, Walking, and Bicycling 760
    Breath 764
    Activated Objects 764
    Summary: Can a Computer Do More Than See and Hear? 772
    7.5 speech synthesis, voice recognition, and 3-d sound 774
    Sound Research 775
    3-D Sound 776
    Speech Synthesis and Manipulation 780
    Speech Recognition 782
    Summary: Something to Talk About 784
    7.6 artificial intelligence 786
    Artificial Intelligence Research 787
    Algorithms for Creativity 789
    Image and Speech Recognition 794
    Interactions with Artificial Characters 797
    Affective Computing 804
    Agents 806
    Summary: The Role of the Arts in Artificial Intelligence and Agent Research 809
    7.7 information and surveillance 812
    Information Management, Visualization, Commerce, and Surveillance 813
    Bar Codes and ID Technologies 814
    Surveillance 815
    Databases and Research Processes 822
    Information Visualization 829
    Reflections on Science 833
    Information Organizations and Structures 836
    Summary: Being Formed by Information 846

    8 Resources 849
    8.1 exhibitions and festivals; educational programs; art, and research
    collaborations; organizational resources, think tanks, and web
    resources 850
    Permanent Spaces, Museums, and Comprehensive Institutions 851
    Competitions and Festivals 857
    Organizations and Information Publishers 860
    Art and Science-Technology Sponsors, Competitions, and Academic Convergence
    Programs 865
    Think Tanks and University Labs 866
    Educational Resources 868
    Research Conferences, Science Magazines, Trade Magazines, and Science and
    Technology Studies 872
    Summary: Institutions as Art 873
    8.2 summary—the future 874

    Newton
  4. Anonymous Member

    ^^^
    This is out of order
    My Bad
    vvv


    2013-0087.pdf Aaron Swartz: Information Arts, Science, Tech January 19, 2013 (10.7MB)

    Information Arts
    Intersections of Art, Science, and Technology
    Stephen Wilson
    The MIT Press
    Cambridge, Massachusetts
    London, England
    vvvv



    Artists

    James Acord
    Kristi Allik
    Mark Amerika
    Suzanne Anker
    Marcel.li Antunez Roca
    Margo K. Apostolos
    Roy Ascott
    Franko B
    Nicolas Anatol Baginsky
    Harlyn Baker
    Bill Barminski
    Gregory Barsamian
    Louis Bec
    Konrad Becker
    Tony Belaver
    Guy Ben-Ary
    Maurice Benayoun
    Bob Bingham
    Trevor Blackwell
    Marc Bo¨hlen
    Christian A. Bohn
    Karl Bohringer
    Tom Bonauro
    Johnny Bradley
    Benjamin Britton
    Shawn Brixey
    Peter Broadwell
    Sheldon Brown
    Leif Brush
    C5
    Patrice Caire
    Jim Campbell
    Bruce Cannon
    Oron Catts
    Shu Lea Cheang
    Mel Chin
    Richard Clar
    Mary Anne Clark
    Harold Cohen
    Brent Collins
    Tim Collins
    Pierre Comte
    Luc Courchesne
    Donna Cox
    Jordan Crandall
    Trevor Darrell
    Char Davies
    Joe Davis
    List

    Walter De Maria
    Paul DeMarinis
    Louis-Philippe Demers
    Andrea Di Castro
    Stewart Dickson
    Elizabeth Diller
    Mark Dion
    Diana Domingues
    Abbe Don
    Kitsou Dubois
    John Dunn
    Hubert Duprat
    Christopher Ebener
    Stephan Eichhorn
    Arthur Elsenaar
    Brian Evans
    Ken Feingold
    Gregory Fischer
    Monika Fleischmann
    Bill Fontana
    Felice Frankel
    Masaki Fujihata
    Rebecca Fuson
    Ulrike Gabriel
    Kit Galloway
    Paul Garrin
    George Gessert
    Bruce Gilchrist
    JoAnn Gillerman
    Ken Goldberg
    Guillermo Go´mez-Pen˜a
    George Gonzalez
    Gaile Gordon
    Reiko Goto
    Sharon Grace
    Group Spirale
    Kazuhiko Hachiya
    Newton Harrison
    Helen Harrison
    Emily Hartzell
    Steven Hartzog
    Grahame Harwood
    Agnes Hegedu¨s
    Michael Heivly
    Nigel Helyer
    Lynn Hershman
    Paul Hertz
    Jerry Hesketh
    Perry Hoberman
    Eric Hobijn
    Carsten Ho¨ller
    Bart Hopkins
    Lisa Hutton
    Tjark Ihmels
    Toshio Iwai
    Natalie Jeremijenko
    Jodi.org
    Ludwig John
    Eduardo Kac
    Ned Kahn
    Paras Kaul
    Yves Klein
    Vitaly Komar
    Milton Komisar
    Richard Kriesche
    Myron Krueger
    Ted Krueger
    Gregory Kuhn
    Mierle Landerman Ukeles
    Jaron Lanier
    Eve Andre´e Larame´e
    Brenda Laurel
    Ray Lauzzanna
    George Legrady

    Webster Lewin
    Carl Loeffler
    Rafael Lozano-Hemmer
    Dirk Luesebrink
    James Luna
    Chico MacMurtie
    John Maeda
    Judy Malloy
    Steve Mann
    Wojciech Matusik
    Delle Maxwell
    Alex Melamid
    Laurent Mignonneau
    Seiko Mikami
    MIT Media Lab Aesthetics and
    Computation Group
    Bonnie Mitchell
    Christian Mo¨ller
    Gordon Monahan
    Knut Mork
    Iain Mott
    Robert Mulder
    Antonio Muntadas
    Fakir Musafar
    Ken Musgrave
    Rob Myers
    Michael Naimark
    Ikuo Nakamura
    Eric Nyberg
    Orlan
    Karen O’Rourke
    Ed Osborn
    Randall Packer
    Eric Paulos
    Kate Pendry
    Simon Penny
    Jean-Marc Philippe
    Clifford Pickover
    Ian Pollock
    Sherrie Rabinowitz
    John Randolph
    Sonya Rapoport
    Alan Rath
    Thomas Ray
    Mark Reaney
    Catherine Richards
    Peter Richards
    Ken Rinaldo
    Don Ritter
    Keith Roberson
    Sara Roberts
    Alexis Rockman
    Bryan Rogers
    Kathleen Rogers
    David Rokeby
    David Rosenboom
    Teri Rueb
    Eric Samakh
    Joachim Sauter
    Remko Scha
    Stefan Schemat
    Julia Scher
    Thecla Schiphorst
    Barry Schwartz
    Ricardo Scofidio
    Jill Scott
    Bill Seaman
    Seemen
    Carlo Sequin
    Paul Sermon
    Jeffrey Shaw
    Roberto Sifuentes
    Todd Siler
    Janet Silk
    Karl Sims
    Joel Slayton
    David Small
    Alexa Smith
    Nina Sobell
    Christa Sommerer
    Alan Sonfist
    Martin Spanjaard
    Richard Stanford
    Ed Stastny
    Stelarc
    Stahl Stenslie
    Wolfgang Strauss
    Rachel Strickland
    Susan Stryker
    Athena Tacha
    Ed Tannenbaum
    Project Taos
    Nell Tenhaaf
    Rob Terry
    Mark Thompson
    Mark Thorpe
    Bruce Tombs
    John Tonkin
    Naoko Tosa
    Michael Touma
    Trimpin
    Normal Tuck
    Tom Van Sant
    Paul Vanouse
    Roman Verostko
    Bill Vorn
    Tamas Waliczky
    Marius Watz
    Peter Weibel
    Barry Brian Werger
    Norman White
    Tom White
    Neil Wiernik
    Gail Wight
    Stephen Wilson
    Uli Winters
    Andrea Wollensak
    John Woodfill
    Arthur Woods
    Kirk Woolford
    Kenji Yanobe
    Pamela Z
    Ionat Zurr
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Anonymous Member

    2013-0087.pdf Aaron Swartz: Information Arts, Science, Tech January 19, 2013 (10.7MB)

    Information Arts
    Intersections of Art, Science, and Technology
    Stephen Wilson
    The MIT Press
    Cambridge, Massachusetts
    London, England

    ************************************
    continued

    Selected Technologies
    Research areas include:

    Bioengineering
    Microbiology and genetics
    Smell, taste, and touch sensors
    Biosensors
    Bioidentification and Biosurveillance
    Neuroscience
    Bionics
    Parapsychology and bioelectricity
    Biological warfare
    Plant and animal behavior
    Ecology
    Technological stimulation of the body
    Surgery
    Tissue culture
    Brain monitoring
    Heartbeat and breath monitoring
    Body modification
    Perception and cognition
    Body imaging
    Death processes
    Nonlinear systems, complexity, and chaos
    Particle physics
    Nanotechnology
    Materials science
    Rapid prototyping
    Global positioning system (GPS)
    Geology and seismic activity
    Fluid dynamics
    Meteorology
    Solar energy
    Fire and magnetics
    Theoretical math
    Fractals
    Algorithms
    Artificial Life
    Genetic Algorithms
    Robot vision and motion
    Robot autonomy
    Subsumption architecture
    Humanoid robots
    Living architecture
    Wireless communication and mobile
    computing
    Location sensitive communication
    Electromagnetic spectrum
    List of Technologies
    xviii
    Desktop video
    Computer Telephone Integration (CTI)
    Virtual communities and telecollaboration
    Telepresence
    Remote museums
    Telemedicine
    Synthetic image and telecommunication
    integration
    Visualizing net activity
    Autonomous flying vehicles
    Parapsychological communication
    Gesture and touch recognition
    Speech recognition and synthesis
    Face and facial expression recognition
    Object tracking and identification
    Video surveillance

    Haptics
    3-D sound
    Motion simulation
  6. Anonymous Member

    2013-0087.pdf Aaron Swartz: Information Arts, Science, Tech January 19, 2013 (10.7MB)

    Information Arts
    Intersections of Art, Science, and Technology
    Stephen Wilson
    The MIT Press
    Cambridge, Massachusetts
    London, England

    continued

    Force feedback
    Immersive virtual reality
    Automatic video interpretation
    Synthetic scene generation
    Ambient sound and sound localization
    Speaker identification and tracking
    Earcons and sonification
    Autonomous software agents
    Social and emotional computing
    Artificial intelligence
    Information visualization and foraging
    Augmented reality systems
    Tangible bits
    Ubiquitous/pervasive/invisible computing

    Wearable computing
    Smart spaces, houses, highways
  7. Anonymous Member

    2013-0087.pdf Aaron Swartz: Information Arts, Science, Tech January 19, 2013 (10.7MB)

    Information Arts
    Intersections of Art, Science, and Technology
    Stephen Wilson
    The MIT Press
    Cambridge, Massachusetts
    London, England

    continued:


    Intermission:
    Read Neuromancer
  8. Anonymous Member

    I find Neuromancer dull.

    Can I read Snow Crash instead?
    • Funny Funny x 1
  9. Anonymous Member

    2013-0093.pdf Aaron Swartz: Surviving Armageddon January 20, 2013 (2.7MB)
    Surviving
    Armageddon
    Solutions for a Threatened Planet
  10. Anonymous Member

    continued
    2013-0093.pdf Aaron Swartz: Surviving Armageddon January 20, 2013 (2.7MB)
    Surviving
    Armageddon
    Solutions for a Threatened Planet
  11. Anonymous Member

    2013-0091.pdf Aaron Swartz: Magic Universe January 20, 2013 (4.8MB)

    contents
    Introduction 1
    Welcome to the spider’s web
    Alcohol 4
    Genetic revelations of when yeast invented booze
    Altruism and aggression 6
    Looking for the origins of those human alternatives
    Antimatter 15
    Does the coat that Sakharov made really explain its absence?
    Arabidopsis 24
    The modest weed that gave plant scientists the big picture
    Astronautics 29
    Will interstellar pioneers be overtaken by their grandchildren?
    Bernal’s ladder 35
    Pointers
    Big Bang 37
    The inflationary Universe’s sleight-of-hand
    Biodiversity 46
    The mathematics of co-existence
    Biological clocks 55
    Molecular machinery that governs life’s routines
    Biosphere from space 61
    ‘I want to do the whole world’
    Bits and qubits 68
    The digital world and its looming quantum shadow
    Black holes 72
    The awesome engines of quasars and active galaxies
    Brain images 80
    What do all the vivid movies really mean?
    Brain rhythms 86
    The mathematics of the beat we think to
    Brain wiring 91
    How do all those nerve connections know where to go?
    Buckyballs and nanotubes 95
    Doing very much more with very much less
    Cambrian explosion 103
    Easy come and easy go, among the early animals
    Carbon cycle 107
    Exactly how does it interact with the global climate?
    Cell cycle 114
    How and when one living entity becomes two
    Cell death 118
    How life makes suicide part of the evolutionary deal
    Cell traffic 122
    Zip codes, stepping-stones and the recognition of life’s complexity
    Cereals 126
    Genetic boosts for the most cosseted inhabitants of the planet
    Chaos 133
    The butterfly versus the ladybird, and the Mercury Effect
    Climate change 141
    Shall we freeze or fry?
    Cloning 149
    Why doing without sex carries a health warning
    Comets and asteroids 155
    Snowy dirtballs and their rocky cousins
    Continents and supercontinents 163
    Collage-making since the world began
    Cosmic rays 169
    Where do the punchiest particles come from?
    Cryosphere 174
    Ice sheets, sea-ice and mountain glaciers tell a confusing tale
    Dark energy 181
    Revealing the power of an accelerating Universe
    Dark matter 187
    A wind of wimps or the machinations of machos?
    Dinosaurs 193
    Why small was beautiful in the end
    Discovery 197
    Why the top experts are usually wrong
    Disorderly materials 205
    The wonders of untidy solids and tidy liquids
    DNA fingerprinting 208
    From parentage cases to facial diversity
    Earth 211
    Why is it so very different from all the other planets of the Sun?
    Earthquakes 219
    Why they may never be accurately predicted, or prevented
    Earthshine 226
    How bright clouds reveal climate change, and perhaps drive it
    Earth system 232
    Pointers
    Eco-evolution 233
    New perspectives on variability and survival
    Electroweak force 238
    How Europe recovered its fading glory in particle physics
    Elements 244
    A legacy from stellar puffs, collapsing giants and exploding dwarfs
    El Nin˜o 253
    When a warm sea wobbles the global weather
    Embryos 257
    ‘Think of the control genes operating a chemical computer’
    Energy and mass 263
    The cosmic currency of Einstein’s most famous equation
    Evolution 268
    Why Darwin’s natural selection was never the whole story

    Extinctions 277
    Were they nearly all due to bolts from the blue?
    Extraterrestrial life 283
    Could we be all alone in the Milky Way?
    Extremophiles 291
    Creatures that thrive in unexpected places
    Flood basalts 297
    Can impacting comets set continents in motion?
    Flowering 302
    Colourful variations on a theme of genetic pathways
    Forces 306
    Pointers
    Galaxies 308
    Looking for Juno’s milk in the infant Universe
    Gamma-ray bursts 312
    New black holes being fashioned every day
    Genes 317
    Words of wisdom from our ancestors, in four colours
    Genomes in general 325
    The whole history of life in a chemical code
    Global enzymes 333
    Why they now fascinate geologists, chemists and biologists
    Grammar 341
    Does it stand between computers and the dominion of the world?
    Gravitational waves 347
    Shaking the Universe with weighty news
    Gravity 350
    Did Uncle Albert really get it right?
    Handedness 360
    Mysteries of left versus right that won’t go away
    Higgs bosons 367
    The multi-billion-dollar quest for the mass-maker
  12. Anonymous Member

    CONTINUED
    MAGIC
    UNIVERSE
    A Grand Tour of Modern Science
    NIGEL CALDER

    2013-0091.pdf Aaron Swartz: Magic Universe January 20, 2013 (4.8MBHigh-speed travel 373

    The common sense of special relativity
    Hopeful monsters 380
    How they herald a revolution in evolution
    Hotspots 388
    Are there really chimneys deep inside the Earth?
    Human ecology 393
    How to progress beyond eco-colonialism
    Human genome 401
    The industrialization of fundamental biology
    Human origins 409
    Why most of those exhumations are only of great-aunts
    Ice-rafting events 417
    Glacial surges in sudden changes of climate
    Immortality 423
    Should we be satisfied with 100 years?
    Immune system 428
    What’s me, what’s you, and what’s a nasty bug?
    Impacts 438
    Physical consequences of collisions with comets and asteroids
    Languages 445
    Why women often set the new fashions in speaking
    Life’s origin 451
    Will the answer to the riddle come from outer space?
    Mammals 459
    Tracing our milk-making forebears in a world of drifting continents
    Matter 465
    Pointers
    Memory 466
    Tracking down the chemistry of retention and forgetfulness

    Microwave background 473
    Looking for the pattern on the cosmic wallpaper
    Minerals in space 479
    From stellar dust to crystals to stones
    Molecular partners 483
    Letting natural processes do the chemist’s work
    Molecules evolving 487
    How the Japanese heretics were vindicated
    Molecules in space 492
    Exotic chemistry among the stars
    Neutrino oscillations 498
    When ghostly particles play hide-and-seek
    Neutron stars 503
    Ticking clocks in the sky, and their silent shadows
    Nuclear weapons 509
    The desperately close-run thing
    Ocean currents 515
    A central-heating system for the world
    Origins 521
    Pointers
    Particle families 522
    Completing the Standard Model of matter and its behaviour
    Photosynthesis 529
    How does your garden grow?
    Plant diseases 536
    An evolutionary arms race or just trench warfare?
    Plants 541
    Pointers
    Plasma crystals 542
    How a newly found force empowers dust
    Plate motions 548
    What rocky machinery refurbishes the Earth’s surface?
    Predators 556
    Come back Brer Wolf, all is forgiven
    Prehistoric genes 559
    Sorting the travelling salesmen from the settlers
    Primate behaviour 567
    Clues to the origins of human culture
    Prions 572
    From cannibals and mad cows to new modes of heredity and evolution
    Protein-making 578
    From an impressionistic dance to a real molecular movie
    Protein shapes 582
    Look forward to seeing them shimmy
    Proteomes 588
    The molecular corps de ballet of living things
    Quantum tangles 595
    From puzzling to spooky to useful
    Quark soup 604
    Recreating a world without protons
    Relativity 607
    Pointers
    Smallpox 608
    The dairymaid’s blessing and the general’s curse
    Solar wind 612
    How it creates the heliosphere in which we live
    Space weather 620
    Why it is now more troublesome than in the old days
    Sparticles 629
    A wished-for superworld of exotic matter and forces
    Speech 633
    A gene that makes us more eloquent than chimpanzees
    Starbursts 640
    Galactic traffic accidents and stellar baby booms
    Stars 643
    Hearing them sing and sizing them up
    Stem cells 648
    Tissue engineering, natural and medical
    Sun’s interior 652
    How sound waves made our mother star transparent
    Superatoms, superfluids and superconductors 660
    The march of the boson armies
    Superstrings 666
    Retuning the cosmic imagination
    Time machines 672
    The biggest issue in contemporary physics?
    Transgenic crops 675
    For better or worse, a planetary experiment has begun
    Tree of life 681
    Promiscuous bacteria and the course of evolution
    Universe 690
    ‘It must have known we were coming’
    Volcanic explosions 699
    Where will the next big one be?
  13. Anonymous Member

    The Emerald
    Planet
    How plants changed Earth’s history
    David Beerling
    2013-0092.pdf Aaron Swartz: Emerald Planet January 20, 2013 (2.5MB)


    Contents
    Preface vi
    Acknowledgements ix
    Illustrations and plates xiv
    Chapter 1 Introduction 1
    2 Leaves, genes, and greenhouse gases 9
    3 Oxygen and the lost world of giants 35
    4 An ancient ozone catastrophe? 61
    5 Global warming ushers in the dinosaur era 87
    6 The Xourishing forests of Antarctica 115
    7 Paradise lost 143
    8 Nature’s green revolution 171
    9 Through a glass darkly 197
    Notes 217
    Index 277
    xiii

    Tunguska event
    • Like Like x 1
  14. Anonymous Member

    2013-0094.pdf Aaron Swartz: Global Catastrophes Introduction January 20, 2013 (2.5MB

    Bill McGuire
    GLOBAL CATASTROPHES
    A Very Short Introduction
    contents
    Preface ix
    List of illustrations xv
    1. A Very Short Introduction to the Earth 1
    2. Global Warming: A Lot of Hot Air? 23
    3. The Ice Age Cometh 44
    4. The Enemy Within: Super-Eruptions, Giant Tsunamis,
      and the Coming Great Quake 62
    5. The Threat from Space: Asteroid and Comet Impacts 89
      Epilogue 113Appendix A: Threat Timescale 117 Appendix B: Geological Timescale Earth 118 Further reading 119Index 124
  15. Anonymous Member

    http://cryptome.org/2013/01/aaron-swartz/052187484X.pdf


    Choosing to Die
    Elective Death and Multiculturalism
    C. G. PRADO
    1. Setting the Stage
    2. Criteria for Rational Suicide
    3. Clarifying and Revising the Criteria
    4. Application Issues
    5. What Standards?
    6. Relativism and Cross-Cultural Assessment
    7. The Role of Religion
    8. Assessment Latitude
    9. The Realities of Cross-Cultural Assessment
    BLABLABLA very pompous but nevertheless interesting. He is forming a structure for decision -making for people who want suicide, the doctors treating them, an institutions.
  16. Anonymous Member

    http://cryptome.org/2013/01/aaron-swartz/Constructing-Knowledge-in-Networks.pdf
    The Rhetorical Nature of XML
    WHAT IS THIS I DON'T EVEN
  17. Anonymous Member

    http://cryptome.org/2013/01/aaron-swartz/Internet-Scientific-Collaboration.pdf


    Scientific Collaboration on the Internet



    Contents



  18. The Wrong Guy Member

    • Like Like x 1
  19. Anonymous Member

    2013-0070.htm Aaron Swartz: Guerilla Open Access Manifesto January 18, 2013

    The list of alleged downloads:

    2013-0048.txt Documents Allegedly Downloaded by Aaron Swartz January 15, 2013

    By request here are Torrent sources for the full collections posted before Cryptome downloaded on December 16, 2010:

    University Presses

    http://thepiratebay.se/torrent/5899376/University_Presses_Ebook_Pack_PHC

    Psychology Complete

    http://thepiratebay.se/torrent/5229849/Psychology_Complete_(alt_seeders)

    Routledge

    http://thepiratebay.se/torrent/5903215/

    Oxford University Press

    http://thepiratebay.se/torrent/5849263/Oxford_University_Press_Ebook_Pack_652_Books_-_Sorted_-_PHC

    Cambridge University Press

    http://thepiratebay.se/torrent/5833828/Cambridge_Univ._Press_Ebook_MEGA_Pack_-_1193_Ebooks_____PHC
  20. Anonymous Member

    Swartz-00009.pdf Aaron Swartz: The Culture of Conspiracy January 16, 2013 (1.0MB)
    A Culture of Conspiracy
    Apocalyptic Visions
    in Contemporary America
    Michael Barkun
    • Like Like x 1
  21. Anonymous Member

    Swartz-00009.pdf Aaron Swartz: The Culture of Conspiracy January 16, 2013 (1.0MB)
    Continue
    • Like Like x 2
  22. Anonymous Member

    Swartz-00006.pdf Aaron Swartz: Media, Politics, Network Society January 16, 2013 (1.9MB)
    M E D I A , P O L I T I C S A N D T H E
    N E T W O R K S O C I E T Y
    R o b e r t H a s s a n
    O P E N U N I V E R S I T Y P R E S S

    • Like Like x 2
  23. Anonymous Member

    Continued
    Swartz-00006.pdf Aaron Swartz: Media, Politics, Network Society January 16, 2013 (1.9MB)
    M E D I A , P O L I T I C S A N D T H E
    N E T W O R K S O C I E T Y
    R o b e r t H a s s a n
    O P E N U N I V E R S I T Y P R E S S
  24. Anonymous Member

  25. Anonymous Member

    Swartz-00011.pdf Aaron Swartz: Spy Wars, Moles, Deadly Games January 16, 2013 (1.0MB)


    Spy Wars
    moles, mysteries,
    and deadly games
    Tennent H. Bagley

    Tennant Bagley is a famous Cold Warrior.
    He was part of a cabal of paranoids obsessed with a “monster plot” to infiltrate the C.I.A., paralyzing useful intelligence gathering with a delusional search for moles.
    After the fall of the USSR, Bagley visited his old K.G.B. adversaries and was able to fill in some of the gaps that frustrated C.I.A. counterintelligence at the time. One theory of the Kennedy assassination names Lee Harvey Oswald as a Russian agent. Bagley doesn't try to prove that, but he wonders whether a mole or two is still buried in the CIA.
    • Like Like x 1
  26. Anonymous Member

    Swartz-00012.pdf Aaron Swartz: Citizen Spy: TV Spying Propaganda January 16, 2013 (2.4MB)
    Citizen Spy
    Television, Espionage, and
    Cold War Culture

    Michael Kackman
    Citizen Spy is the Cold War as seen through TV of the 60s. He touches on the use of "pro-spy" shows as propaganda.
    • Like Like x 1
  27. Anonymous Member

    Swartz-00036.pdf Aaron Swartz: March of Unreason January 20, 2013 (1.9MB)

    March of Unreason





    • Like Like x 1
  28. A.O.T.F Member

    NICE!! Thanks - Great thread .. keep em comin
  29. Hello,

    we would like to know more about anonymous,
    do you know where we can ask questions that will be answered.

    thanks.
  30. A.O.T.F Member


    What questions specifically ?
  31. How can we support anonymous ?
    How can we have a private talk with a member of anonymous?

    we think you do a great job.
    thanks for your comment
  32. A.O.T.F Member

    You can PM me here

    Thank You
  33. Anonymous Member

    Swartz-00059.pdf Aaron Swartz: Human Liberty - Freedom of Speech January 23, 2013 (30.5MB)
    HUMAN LIBERTY
    AND
    FREEDOM OF SPEECH
    C. Edwin Baker

    Contents
    I THEORY
    Introduction, 3
    1 The Classic Marketplace of Ideas Theory, 6
    2 Possible Modifications, 25
    3 The Liberty Theory, 47
    4 Protection of Action, 70
    5 The Process of Change, 92
    II APPLICATIONS
    6 Time, Place, and Manner Regulations: Unreasoned
    Reasonableness, 125
    7 Mandatory Parade Permits, 138
    8 Absolute Protection: Tentative Principles, 161
    9 Commercial Speech: A Problem in the Theory of Freedom, 194
    10 Press Rights, 225
    11 Private Economic Threats to Press Freedom, 250
    Conclusion: The First Amendment and Constitutional
    Interpretation, 272
    Notes, 285
    Index,
    • Like Like x 1
  34. Anonymous Member

    Continued

    HUMAN LIBERTY
    AND
    FREEDOM OF SPEECH
    C. Edwin Baker

    The Liberty Theory

    This is a exacting discussion of the interpretation of the Constitution and the First Amendment. Freedom of Speech is not limited to the "Open Marketplace" theory. The economic influences on freedom of speech limit free speech, we only see what is marketable. The Liberty Theory supports all speech/action that is non violent.
    • Like Like x 1
  35. Anonymous Member

    Swartz-00055.pdf Aaron Swartz: Overcriminalization January 23, 2013 (1.6MB)

    Overcriminalization
    The Limits of the Criminal Law

    Douglas Husak

    Contents

    1 The Amount of Criminal Law 3
    I. Too Much Punishment, Too Many Crimes 4
    II. How More Crimes Produce Injustice 17
    III. The Content of New Offenses 33
    IV. An Example of Overcriminalization 45
    2 Internal Constraints on Criminalization 55
    I. The “General Part” of Criminal Law 58
    II. From Punishment to Criminalization 77
    III. A Right Not to Be Punished? 92
    IV. Malum Prohibitum 103
    3 External Constraints on Criminalization 120
    I. Infringing the Right Not to Be Punished 122
    II. The Devil in the Details 132
    III. Crimes of Risk Prevention 159
    4 Alternative Theories of Criminalization 178
    I. Law and Economics 180
    II. Utilitarianism 188
    III. Legal Moralism 196
    Table of Cases 207
    Bibliography 209
    Index 225

    • Like Like x 1
  36. A.O.T.F Member

    OOOOO Goody goody - Thanks!
  37. Anonymous Member

    Swartz-00039.pdf Aaron Swartz: Postcolonialism Introduction January 20, 2013 (18.9MB)
    Robert J. C. Young
    POSTCOLONIALISM
    A Very Short Introduction

  38. Anonymous Member

    Continued

    Swartz-00039.pdf Aaron Swartz: Postcolonialism Introduction January 20, 2013 (18.9MB)
    Robert J. C. Young
    POSTCOLONIALISM
    A Very Short Introduction



  39. Anonymous Member

    This is a short version of Zinn with fewer examples. The force of "A People's History"comes from the reiteration of the same story. This book doesn't pack the same punch, but that's why its called a "very short introduction".
  40. Anonymous Member

    A Guide to
    the End
    of the World
    EVERYTHING YOU NEVER WANTED
    TO KNOW
    Bill McGuire

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