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BUY NOTHING DAY

Discussion in 'News and Current Events' started by Anonymous, Nov 29, 2013.

  1. Anonymous Member

    • Like Like x 2
  2. Anonymous Member

  3. Anonymous Member

    I'm not buying this.
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  4. Anonymous Member

    http://motherboard.vice.com/blog/black-friday-is-more-political-than-ever

    http://twitchy.com/2013/11/29/eats-...ts-in-violence-of-black-friday-walmartfights/
  5. Anonymous Member

    If buying stuff is no good, shouldn't this be everyday?
  6. JohnnyRUClear Member

    FTFY. Two words usually have a different meaning than the same two words combined into one. In fact, they're usually a different part of speech entirely, as is the case here. "Everyday" is an adjective, where "every day" is an adverbial phrase.

    This goes for tons of often-abused words:

    "setup" = noun
    "login" = noun
    "backup" = noun or adjective
    (etc.)

    These words are often misused as verbs. They aren't, as you can immediately see when you try to add "-ing" to any of them. For verbs, use the words in their separated forms:

    "set up" ("setting up")
    "log in" ("logging in")
    "back up" ("backing up")
    (etc.)

    I'm glad that you care and are going to do better from now on.
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Anonymous Member

    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/everyday

    "Everyday" is indeed an adjective. It is, however, appropriate to the sentence.

    "Shouldn't this be everday?" is equivalent to "Shouldn't this be commonplace?", or "Shouldn't this be appropriate for ordinary days?"
    You're welcome.
  8. JohnnyRUClear Member

    Yes, but you're reaching. "Every day" is what was originally meant.
    • Like Like x 1
  9. White Tara Global Moderator

    oooh! linguistic smackdown ITT. :)
  10. Anonymous Member

    So, you were the author, and that was your intention?
  11. JohnnyRUClear Member

    Nope.
  12. Anonymous Member

  13. Anonymous Member


    Not true, as there was an implied/inferred verb (done, practiced, experienced, etc.), so using it as an adverbial phrase was, indeed, correct.
  14. JohnnyRUClear Member

    Perhaps you could clarify what you meant by "it". If we add in any of those verbs, "everyday" does not fit after it, while "every day" does. The adverbial phrase "every day" was the correct wording, which is what I said. There is no way to use "everyday" as an adverbial phrase; it's an adjective -- or, rarely, a noun, as Anon pointed out.
  15. Anonymous Member


    You are correct, sir. I saw your quote (in which you had corrected the poster above you, but I didn't realize it) and thought you were saying "every day" was incorrect.

    I'm sorry, Johnny. So, so sorry. :(
    • Like Like x 2
  16. Yeah. It's totally edgy to engage in the potlatch culture. I do it, and you should, too!

    I mean, why ask "why?"?
  17. Anonymous Member

    I drink bud dry!
  18. trippyhippo Member

    who cares?!
  19. Anonymous Member

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  20. Anonymous Member

    • Like Like x 1
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