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Daily Mail: "Scientology town Clearwater"

Discussion in 'Media' started by The Wrong Guy, Mar 31, 2015.

  1. The Wrong Guy Member

    Gabe Cazares and Hubbard Policy

    By Mike Rinder, December 12, 2017

    Quote:

    Tony Ortega has a must-read article on his blog this morning.

    Researcher R. M. Seibert obtained Freedom of Information Act documents from the FBI about the “ops” (the scientology term — short for operations — to describe campaigns against enemies) against former Clearwater Mayor Gabe Cazares. The stories about what was done to Cazares are horrifying.

    But it’s also worth noting the underlying POLICY of scientology that resulted in these actions against enemies of scientology.

    It is often claimed (and I did it myself for many years) that the Guardian’s Office were “rogue operatives” — but that ignores the fact that L. Ron Hubbard laid out how to go about destroying enemies of scientology with these sort of staged operations and planting of false stories. Hubbard fancied himself as a spy and wrote a considerable amount of scientology POLICY about the craft of “intelligence” and covertly controlling and influencing people and situations for the benefit of scientology.

    This is STILL THE POLICY of scientology. It is written by L. Ron Hubbard and thus cannot be changed or altered in any way.

    Read the article by Tony Ortega today before you read the document below. You will understand how scientology using planted documents and fake scenarios to smear and scandalize opponents came to be.

    The examples of “Gosh Porge” and “Bish Smish” in the reference below are not just funny asides. They are directives on HOW to destroy someone. The parallels to Cazares and Paulette Cooper are eery.

    This is ONE of Hubbard’s writings, directed to the Guardian’s Office. It has subsequently been formalized into an “OSA NW Order” — this is a retype of the original communication Hubbard sent to his wife, Mary Sue (CS-G – Commodore’s Staff Guardian Office) and other Guardian Office executives and “intelligence” personnel. As with a lot of Hubbard’s communication on “sensitive” matters, it was not signed. He did not want to incriminate himself (in later years, he would sign his name “*”). Bear in mind, this is just ONE of the documents Hubbard authored on the subject of “Intelligence” and dealing with enemies. It happens to be the one that has the most direct relevance to the story today.

    Below the document I have pulled some specific passages to highlight and comment on them.

    Continued at https://www.mikerindersblog.org/gabe-cazares-and-hubbard-policy/
  2. The Wrong Guy Member

    He was Scientology’s most famous spy, then he turned witness and vanished. Now, here he is.

    By Tony Ortega, December 14, 2017

    Quote:

    In 2014, while we were working on our book about Paulette Cooper, The Unbreakable Miss Lovely, we got a fascinating break.

    A researcher who was helping us said that he had managed to track down Michael Meisner.

    For those of us who study Scientology’s history, it’s a name that has always been shrouded in mystery. We have often wondered what happened to the super spy who carried out much of the legendary Snow White Program, the largest domestic infiltration of the U.S. federal government in its history, on behalf of Scientology’s infamous original spy wing, the Guardian’s Office.

    Meisner was born in Chicago in 1950, and was a college student at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign when he became interested in the Scientology mission there in November 1970. He was later trained for the Guardian’s Office and then was sent to Washington DC in 1973 as L. Ron Hubbard’s Snow White Program was going into effect around the world.

    Meisner became responsible for a stunning amount of burglarizing in Washington DC federal agencies, as we explain at some length in our book.

    But then, one of the FBI’s first female agents, a woman named Christine Hansen, answered a call about a pair of suspicious characters at a DC law library on June 11, 1976. She questioned the men, Michael Meisner and his partner, Gerald Wolfe, and then let them go, but later realized they had given her false information. By pure luck, on June 30 she ran into Wolfe again at the IRS headquarters and put him under arrest.

    Scientology sent Meisner into hiding in Los Angeles as they watched what would happen with Wolfe, and then put Meisner under guard when he became impatient.

    A year later, in June 1977, Meisner escaped his Scientology guards and turned himself in to the FBI. Three weeks after that, on July 8, 1977, the FBI served search warrants at three Scientology locations in DC and Los Angeles in what was the largest raid in FBI history.

    Meisner then served as a witness as the Justice Department prosecuted and got convictions for eleven top Scientology officials, including Hubbard’s wife, Mary Sue.

    And then, Meisner vanished.

    Now, our researcher told us where he was living, and showed us how he knew this was the same Michael J. Meisner, born August 8, 1950, who had attended the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and who had turned witness for the FBI.

    We sent a letter to Meisner and called him, asking if he’d be interested in speaking to us for our book, and hoping that he would — one of the things that we were trying to do in Miss Lovely was get multiple perspectives on the operations that had been aimed at Paulette Cooper.

    Meisner claimed we had the wrong guy, and told us not to call him again.

    We let the matter rest for several years.

    But now, we are bringing it up for multiple reasons. First, because we obtained the FBI file on former Clearwater mayor Gabe Cazares, which we made public Tuesday. It was Meisner who told the FBI about the details of Scientology’s plot to ruin Cazares with a bizarre hit-and-run accident in DC in 1976.

    And also, in the years since we first contacted Meisner, one of our excellent helpers, researcher Eivol Ekdal, has tracked down photographs of Meisner which helped us learn how he managed to transform himself and his life in almost unbelievable ways.

    After he provided testimony in the Snow White case and then obtained a new identity in a witness protection program, Michael Meisner went back to school, got an engineering degree, and then by 1981 found work in, of all places, the nuclear power industry.

    He started out as a licensing engineer with the company that became Entergy in New Orleans, then moved to Vicksburg, Mississippi in 1988 at the Grand Gulf nuclear power station. By 1996, he was the director of licensing for five Entergy nuclear power plants, and then he became president of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company in 1998 and then its chief nuclear officer.

    His rise was meteoric, and it was all done under his original name. (He apparently only used the assumed identity for his return to college.) From 1997 to 2005, Meisner oversaw the decommissioning and deconstruction of the Maine Yankee nuclear power plant in Wiscasset, and then retired.

    And almost as surprising, we learned that Meisner’s sister, Mary Jo Meisner, became well known as a newspaper reporter and editor — she was city editor of the Washington Post from 1987 to 1991, editor in chief of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel from 1993 to 1997 and a vice president of the prestigious Boston Foundation from 2001 to 2016. Three times, she was a judge for the Pulitzer Prizes. Today, she teaches at Harvard. But she sure sat on one hell of a story during all that time.

    Fascinated that Mike Meisner felt so secure that he had gone back to his original name, we hoped he would talk to us about his amazing second life. But he’s not interested.

    Continued at https://tonyortega.org/2017/12/14/h...e-turned-witness-and-vanished-now-here-he-is/
  3. The Wrong Guy Member

    Clearwater looks to revisit land swap with Church of Scientology | Tampa Bay Times

    By Tracey McManus, December 22, 2017

    Quote:

    In June, City Council members surprised Church of Scientology officials when they voted to halt a land swap that had been in the works for months.

    The church had bought a vacant lot just east of downtown under the impression it could trade it for three small city-owned parcels Scientology needs for its campus.

    When it came time to make the trade official, however, engineering staff cautioned the city may need those unused parcels in the future. Council members decided the timing was not right and voted 4-1 to postpone the swap indefinitely with Council member Bob Cundiff voting against waiting.

    Citing a now-urgent need for the Scientology-owned lot on Cleveland Street to use as retail parking, the city has asked to restart negotiations with the church. But since the first time around, local church officials have gone dark on communicating with the city.

    City attorney Pam Akin said she contacted Scientology attorneys at the end of November to arrange a meeting with local church officials and update the conversation. She said she has still not gotten a response on whether they are willing to meet.

    City Manager Bill Horne said Scientology leader David Miscavige called him on Dec. 8 because "he was apparently aware of (Akin) reaching out and not getting a response."

    "He said for us to move forward with it, and that’s what we’re trying to do," Horne said.

    Scientology spokeswoman Karin Pouw did not respond to a request for comment.

    Horne said if church officials are not willing to meet with city staff, the details will have to be worked out between each side’s lawyers and could go to the Council for a vote early next year. Church staff has drastically cut back communication after the City Council voted in April to buy a 1.4 acre downtown lot the church also coveted.

    This land swap would involve the church trading its lot, adjacent to the Nolen apartment complex at 949 Cleveland St., in exchange for: 600 Franklin St., which holds the former fire marshal building; a parcel on the northwest corner of S Garden Avenue and Court Street with seven parking spaces; and nine parking spaces on Watterson Avenue that abut the Garden Avenue parking garage.

    After the Council voted down the swap, Scientology attorney Monique Yingling called the decision unfounded because the deal had been in the works for six months with no previous sign of hesitation from staff.

    She stated in a letter her clients would be watching to see if religious discrimination was at play.

    City commissioned appraisals showed the Scientology lot is valued at $600,000, well above the $425,000 combined value of the three city parcels.

    But since they voted to postpone the trade, some City Council members who had reservations say those concerns have changed over the six months.

    Continued at http://www.tampabay.com/news/localg...and-swap-with-Church-of-Scientology_163746669
  4. I think it's just about time to start referring to McManus in the same sentence and breath that we talk about Tobin and Childs.
  5. The Wrong Guy Member

    Clearwater City Council Candidate Tom Keller says he’s a voice for the ordinary resident

    Editor’s note: Ahead of the March 13 election, the Tampa Bay Times is publishing profiles on Clearwater City Council candidates for Seat 4 today. Profiles on candidates for Seat 5 will appear next week.

    By Tracey McManus, January 12, 2018

    Excerpt:

    Keller said he would advocate for the swift implementation of Imagine Clearwater, the city’s $55 million waterfront redevelopment plan, but would be a watchdog to ensure conservative spending on construction costs.

    He said he supports the plan as a way to revitalize the city’s long-struggling downtown. He said while the Church of Scientology takes immaculate care of its properties, its overwhelming presence downtown can be a deterrent to the general public.

    "If they are going to buy property downtown or buy any more, is it going to be something all the citizens can enjoy?" Keller said. "Moving forward, I want to speak to them and tell them my desire with anything they’re doing, I don’t want to have to convert to Scientology to enjoy stuff they’re doing down there. We can’t just have Scientology downtown."

    Keller said he is interested in improving communication between the city and the church, which has frayed in recent months, but that he has not yet been in touch with church officials for his campaign.

    More at http://www.tampabay.com/news/politi...s-a-voice-for-the-ordinary-resident_164308754

    Clearwater City Council candidate David Allbritton touts track record in civic life

    By Tracey McManus, January 12, 2018

    Excerpt:

    Allbritton said the city’s $55 million Imagine Clearwater waterfront redevelopment plan is key to bringing downtown back to life. He said maintaining open communication with the Church of Scientology, downtown’s largest property owner, in that effort will be vital.

    But he said encouraging private business to invest so the redevelopment plan does not "lose steam" is just as crucial. He said being an advocate for revitalization and helping businesses navigate the process of opening shop during this transition phase is one of his priorities.

    "In the near future we’re going to start seeing, instead of the city and Scientology trying to get together on things, there’s going to be a third leg to this," he said. "There’s going to be the private sector, and if we can get the private sector in with the city and Scientology, I think we can make some things happen."

    More at http://www.tampabay.com/news/politi...on-touts-track-record-in-civic-life_164342754
  6. The Wrong Guy Member

    Clearwater city council candidate gets ringing endorsement from a Scientology front

    By Tony Ortega, January 26, 2018

    Quote:

    One of our tipsters forwarded to us an email put out by Pat Clouden of the Concerned Businessmen’s Association of Tampa Bay, which is a ringing endorsement for candidate John Funk in the upcoming March 13 election for Clearwater city council members.

    “There is one guy running who we really like. We’ve met him and he is a like-minded fellow who would be awesome for Clearwater City Council Seat 5. His name is John Funk,” the email says.

    Well, that’s nice, but Mr. Funk is apparently a bit of a longshot. As Tampa Bay Times reporter Tracey McManus explained last week, he’s a political newcomer who is trying to unseat a popular incumbent, Hoyt Hamilton, and he has some dodgy things on his record.

    There are some tax liens and bankruptcies in his past, for example, but Funk explained to McManus that in his 40 years selling real estate, there have been some tough years, which we can certainly appreciate.

    But there’s also the thing about running over a motorcyclist in 2011. McManus found that Funk was cited in an accident that killed 53-year-old motorcyclist Eugene Harris.

    “That was not my fault but I did get cited, yes, because they were on a mission to make sure that I got a ticket,” Funk told McManus. “It was horrific. … It’s something you don’t ever forget.”

    So, OK, this guy has some hurdles to overcome as he attempts to get elected to Clearwater’s city council.
    But hey, with the CBA and Pat Clouden on board, maybe he’ll get some momentum going?

    That is, if an endorsement by a Scientology front group and one of the church’s most active members and boosters is the kind of thing that helps a candidate get elected in Clearwater.

    We sent an email to Funk, asking him what he thought about a Scientology front organization endorsing his run for city council. We’ll let you know if he responds.

    Continued at https://tonyortega.org/2018/01/26/c...ringing-endorsement-from-a-scientology-front/
  7. The Wrong Guy Member

    Clearwater council candidate’s development plan relies on Scientology’s cooperation

    By Tracey McManus, January 12, 2018

    Quote:

    On the campaign trail and during recent debates, City Council candidate John Funk has made one issue the crux of his platform.

    He has questioned whether the city should be prioritizing its $55 million waterfront redesign Imagine Clearwater and business incentives as the keys to revitalize downtown. Instead he is pushing a redevelopment idea of his own:

    Funk has proposed luring a private developer to build a boutique outdoor mall on a roughly 10-acre cluster of properties along the south side of Drew Street between Fort Harrison Avenue and the railroad tracks on East Avenue. With the right investor and cooperation of the property owners, he has said, the area could be turned into a high-end shopping center like Third Street Promenade in Santa Monica, Calif.

    He pivoted to the proposal in two recent debates when asked specific questions about Imagine Clearwater, downtown parking, business incentives, regionalism and restaurant recruitment.

    "There’s a part of downtown that is a jewel box as far as I’m concerned," Funk said at a Feb. 8 City Hall forum. "I would boldly like to say we need to see about developing that 10-acre piece."

    Most of the footprint in Funk’s 10-acre proposal is controlled by the Church of Scientology or its parishioners. Even if he were to recruit an interested developer, the project would require Scientology and the other property owners to sell or agree to redevelop their properties.

    Funk, 71, a real estate broker, declined an interview with the Tampa Bay Times to discuss specifics of his plan or whether he’s working with Scientology officials. Scientology spokesman Ben Shaw did not respond to questions about whether the church was working with Funk.

    However, Funk’s proposal mirrors some aspects of a redevelopment project Scientology pitched last year for downtown, home to the church’s international spiritual headquarters.

    In March 2017, Scientology leader David Miscavige offered to renovate Cleveland Street buildings, recruit high-end retail to empty storefronts in the downtown core and build an entertainment complex with actor Tom Cruise on three blocks of mostly vacant land along Myrtle Avenue.

    Miscavige hinged the offer to build this "outdoor mall" on the condition the city agree to step aside so he could buy a 1.4-acre vacant lot on Pierce Street the church needed for its campus. He rescinded the entire retail offer in April, when the city bought the Pierce Street property from the Clearwater Marine Aquarium for $4.25 million, a third of the price Miscavige offered.

    Miscavige purchased the mostly vacant Myrtle Avenue stretch for $9 million in February 2017 under a limited liability corporation in anticipation of the now-defunct retail project.

    A one-block portion of Scientology’s Myrtle property covers the eastern boundary of Funk’s 10-acre development proposal.

    At the Feb. 8 candidate forum at City Hall, Funk described the boundaries of his proposal as "the south of Drew Street behind Fort Harrison and to the west of the railroad tracks behind Bank of America." At a Clearwater Downtown Partnership forum on Feb. 5, he brought a rendering of the site that excluded part of Scientology’s buildings along Fort Harrison, which have the public Waterson Avenue behind them.

    When asked to clarify the discrepancies of the boundaries in an email with the Times, Funk responded vaguely: "After decades of inaction it’s time to let the marketplace set the boundaries. The developer has indicated that this would be the general area."

    Funk did not name a developer he is working with and declined an interview request for specifics. Shaw did not respond to the question of whether Funk’s proposal is related to Miscavige’s 2017 retail plan.

    The church controls nearly every parcel on the western boundary of Funk’s proposal of Fort Harrison Avenue, with four buildings owned under the Scientology name, one under a corporation managed by church secretary Glen Stilo, and one owned by a corporation authorized by renowned pianist and Scientologist Chick Corea, according to property records.

    Separate corporations managed by Scientology parishioner Fabio Zaniboni own one property on Drew Street and one on N Garden Avenue within Funk’s footprint. Zaniboni did not respond to a request for comment.

    Another property on Drew Street is owned by a corporation registered to parishioner Vladislav Musatov, who could not be reached for comment.

    Andrew Nall, owner of Nall Lumber on Drew Street, is the longest resident of this stretch, with his family’s business in the same location for 102 years. Nall, who said he is not a member of Scientology, said he has no plans to sell.

    Although Funk has publicly proposed naming the outdoor mall "The Nall Mall" in honor of the family, Nall said he does not approve the use of his name.

    "He hasn’t approached us about it," Nall said.

    Investor Daniels Ikajevs owns a large parking lot that takes up roughly a third of the 10-acre footprint. Ikajevs, who has said previously he is not a member of Scientology, did not respond to a request for comment.

    Nine of the 12 properties in the cluster sold within the last decade for a combined $13.3 million, according to property records. Additionally, Scientology bought the stretch of parcels along Myrtle Avenue in one $9 million deal but only the portion to the west of the railroad tracks overlaps into Funk’s proposal.

    Funk, who is running against Seat 5 incumbent Hoyt Hamilton in the March 13 election, is the only candidate in either of the two races to run his campaign with support from prominent Scientologists. Retired building contractor David Allbritton and advertising salesman Tom Keller are running for Seat 4, being vacated by the term-limited Bill Jonson.

    Aside from the $3,196 Funk has used from his own pockets, most of the remaining $10,000 he has raised has come from prominent Scientology members like PostcardMania founder Joy Gendusa; Consumer Energy Solutions CEO Pat Clouden; cybersecurity training startup KnowBe4 owner Stu Sjouwerman; Markets for Makers founder Natalie Nagengast; David and Monica Agami, of the Agami family building the Skyview condo on Cleveland Street; Scientology donor Claire Loehwing; and Consumer Sales Solutions founder Tom Cummins, according to treasurer reports. He also received support from Mary Repper, a former political consultant who has done extensive public relations work for the church.

    City Manager Bill Horne said in his 20 years as Clearwater’s top administrator, he’s never seen an elected official or a candidate push a development proposal without city staff input and collaboration.

    Horne said Funk has not discussed the project with him or his staff, and the little information he’s gotten about it has been from the public candidate forums.

    Typically, the City Council would vote as a body whether to use city resources to approach property owners and create a development plan. Or a developer would approach the city with a concept after already assembling property, Horne said.

    "Our philosophy has always been ‘Let’s create the best environment for redevelopment,’?" Horne said. "Our philosophy has not been to go out and be the private sector and be the private market."

    Source: http://www.tampabay.com/news/politi...relies-on-Scientology-s-cooperation_165855024
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  8. The Wrong Guy Member

  9. The Wrong Guy Member

    Scientology tries to get a Christian minister in trouble for helping Dee Findlay burn her past

    By Tony Ortega, May 1, 2018

    Quote:

    Dee Findlay ended 2017 with an item from her bucket list: She burned more than $10,000 worth of Scientology materials that she had bought on an impulse back in 2010.

    Dee is a well known figure here at the Underground Bunker. She’s been celebrated for her memorable address to the Clearwater City Council regarding a controversial land purchase that the Church of Scientology wanted to get its mitts on. She’s been outspoken about her work as an OSA volunteer in the 1980s, helping the church spy on local officials, and she regrets being pulled back into the organization temporarily in 2010.

    But she still had a huge pile of books and lectures sitting around from that brief return, and she wanted to get rid of it.

    “It was well over $10,000 I paid. And I didn’t know what I was going to do with it all. Most of them were never opened,” she says. She knew she didn’t want to throw it in a dumpster. “I didn’t want the responsibility of anyone else going near any of that stuff. So that’s what I had on my bucket list — a bonfire.”

    As the end of the year approached, she mentioned it to her friends Deb and Dick Maxwell, who have become known for their activism at Scientology’s Clearwater buildings.

    “I became friends with them. I showed them what I had, and they offered to do it. They brought a trailer,” she says. And they took the pile of books to a place where they knew they could burn it without breaking the law — behind the church the Maxwells belong to.

    “It’s in the country, and they knew they were allowed to do it. There was no problem with having the fire there,” Dee says.

    Before lighting the pile, they carefully separated out plastic binders and other items to throw in a recycling bin. And then they lit what was left.

    <snipped>

    Now, however, the pastor at the church where the fire occurred, and where the Maxwells are members, has received a letter of complaint from the Church of Scientology’s Pat Harney, a Sea Org member who works for Scientology’s secret police and PR squad, the Office of Special Affairs.

    It’s a very entertaining the letter, and a classic of its kind, right out of the L. Ron Hubbard playbook. Harney writes to Pastor Bill Strayer of the Calvary Chapel Worship Center in New Port Richey, trying to get the Maxwells in trouble for the fire.

    We told the Maxwells we loved the detail about the Nazis burning books “by Jewish authors.” Scientology never tires of trying to compare its plight to the Holocaust. “They are entertaining, to say the least,” Dick told us. “And we love Dee!”

    <snipped>

    [IMG]
    [IMG]
    More at https://tonyortega.org/2018/05/01/s...rouble-for-helping-dee-findlay-burn-her-past/
  10. The Wrong Guy Member

    Editorial: Clearwater should slow effort to switch to strong mayor | Tampa Bay Times

    Establishing a strong mayor government in Clearwater would offer no guarantee of better government or of faster progress on Imagine Clearwater. The real issue about rejuvenating downtown is not whether there is a strong mayor — it’s the long shadow of the Church of Scientology, downtown’s largest property owner.

    http://www.tbo.com/opinion/editoria...ow-effort-to-switch-to-strong-mayor_167850215
  11. The Wrong Guy Member

    Clearwater’s land swap with Scientology seemed like a good idea, until it wasn’t, but maybe is again

    By Tracey McManus, May 7, 2017

    Quote:

    A real estate trade with the Church of Scientology that the city asked for, then shot down, then revived, only to kill it all over again is back for another round, giving whiplash to all involved.

    Here’s what’s at play: the city owns three small properties downtown, one with a vacant building and two with a handful of parking spaces, the church wants for its campus. The church owns a vacant lot east of downtown the city wants for retail parking.

    <snipped>

    The council voted 3-2 Thursday to vacate a right-of-way required for the swap.

    More at http://www.tampabay.com/news/scient...-until-it-wasn-t-but-maybe-is-again_167941589
  12. The Wrong Guy Member

    Clearwater approves land swap with Scientology after a year of back-and-forth

    By Tracey McManus, May 18, 2017

    Quote:

    The third time was the charm for the city to close a long-debated real estate deal with the Church of Scientology.

    After two previous deals were scuttled over more than a year of negotiations, the City Council voted 3-1 on Thursday night to give Scientology three small downtown properties in exchange for a vacant parking lot on Cleveland Street.

    City Council member Hoyt Hamilton voted in opposition and Vice Mayor Doreen Caudell was absent.

    The city plans to use its newly acquired lot, adjacent to the Nolen apartments at 949 Cleveland Street, as retail parking for businesses. Community Redevelopment Agency Director Amanda Thompson said the space was critical to recruit commercial tenants at the Nolen — which has struggled without a retail parking lot — and for the 15-story high-rise under construction across the street.

    Scientology will acquire the former fire marshal building at 600 Franklin St., seven parking spaces at S Garden Avenue and Court Street, and nine parking spaces on Watterson Avenue.

    The vacant lot the city will receive is worth $185,000 more than the three properties it’s giving up, according to the most recent appraisals.

    The Franklin Street property and the Court Street parking spaces surround the footprint of Scientology’s proposed L. Ron Hubbard Hall auditorium.

    Scientology spokesman Ben Shaw did not respond to a request for comment Thursday or previous questions about the church’s intention for the Watterson Avenue spaces, which are four blocks north of the other two properties.

    Hamilton said although the city would be gaining higher valued property in the deal, he is uncomfortable doing business with Scientology since church officials have almost completely stopped communicating with city officials.

    The city is working to revitalize downtown with restaurants, retail and a reshaped waterfront park. But Hamilton said Scientology is "not showing they are interested in the same things the people of Clearwater are."

    "I would love for Scientology to prove me wrong when I say I’m not sure that’s what they want to see," he said. "I would welcome them to prove me wrong and show that I’m wrong.

    "But because of the fact they’re not communicating with us right now, I’m not inclined to move forward with this land swap."

    Continued at http://www.tampabay.com/news/scient...logy-after-a-year-of-back-and-forth_168341556

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