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Edward Snowden exposes National Security Agency domestic surveillance

Discussion in 'News and Current Events' started by The Wrong Guy, Jun 5, 2013.

  1. Anonymous Member

    I missed where Scientology was ever able, or could ever be able, to ask a company like Verizon to hand over all their customer's call information....
  2. The Internet Member

    Lol, "ask."
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  3. Horseradish Member

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  4. Anonymous Member

  5. Anonymous Member

  6. The Wrong Guy Member

    Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind revelations of NSA surveillance

    The 29-year-old source behind the biggest intelligence leak in the NSA's history explains his motives, his uncertain future and why he never intended on hiding in the shadows

    By Glenn Greenwald, Ewen MacAskill and Laura Poitras in Hong Kong

    Q&A with NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden: 'I do not expect to see home again'

    Link to video: NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden: 'I don't want to live in a society that does these sort of things'

    www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jun/09/edward-snowden-nsa-whistleblower-surveillance
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  7. Anonymous Member

  8. Anonymous Member

    In closing, I'll just leave this here ...

    Some of you will remember this slide. It's from a PowerPoint deck drafted by Palantir Technologies, Inc. in 2011 in preparation for the HBGary Federal / Palantir / Berico / Hunton & Williams pitch to the US Chamber of Commerce and Bank of America to discredit and discourage investigative journalists who are supportive of wikileaks. It seemed that the particular journalist these groups wished most to discredit was (wait for it) ... Glenn Greenwald, the reporter who last Thursday leaked the NSA PRISM story in The Guardian.

    Small world, eh?

    HBGary_Greenwald.jpg
  9. Horseradish Member

  10. Anonymous Member

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  11. Boris Korczak Member

    Get PeerBlock to secure some of your staff. It cost nothing and works to certain degree.
    http://download.cnet.com/3028-10435...dlcom_sem&aid=peerblock-p&dlc=n&part=fivemill
    P2P will be of main use since it blocks the gov spying on you.
    Stay safe.
    BK

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  12. The Wrong Guy Member

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  13. Calling all Hong Kong Anons - Can you help him?
    • Dislike Dislike x 1
  14. Anonymous Member

    You sound like a fucking Scientologist.
  15. Andy Downs Member

    He is the interesting part about what has become my lecturing career....I never approached one agency or organization. They keep calling me.
    The former FBI agents are generally big supporters of mine. I even have their endorsements on my website. State and local negotiators are huge supporters.
    The Dallas event where I was shunned by FBI agents is the same event I was approached by 3 other negotiation association to come and speak.
    Tactical groups want no part of my message. The negotiators love me. That is also indicative of the culture in law enforcement today. The guys who want to use brains before bullets are the least funded, least utilized, and least wanted. There are cops and FBI negotiators that if they had the power and rank could have prevented every high profile screw up you can think of where guns go crazy and common sense out the door.
    However the tactical guys win almost every time.
    My family's case Downs vs USA 522 F.d2 990 is the case that forced the FBI to start the first hostage negotiation teams. My dad's case has been written about in text books for years. But none of them knew any facts about the case.

    It took almost 2 years of speaking to law enforcement and universities until the FBI actually invited me to speak in Nashville. It was such a big deal that Associated Press covered it.

    There are huge divides in law enforcement about tactics vs negotiations just like there are huge divides in the intelligence community about the NSA dragnet.
    It is a culture where if you speak up, you become a target, then your career is finished. I have talked to a lot of FBI and police that have told me if they speak up about a policy or something they feel is truly wrong, they are screwed. That is the culture that has to change, but I don;t know how.
    All that being said, the active FBI agents can't stand me and some are very open about their feelings.
  16. The Wrong Guy Member

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  17. sallysock Member

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  18. Andy Downs Member

    One thing that has not been addressed is the fact that the FBI gets data via NSA effectively ends the attorney client privilege. That privilege has been attacked via the National Security Letters, Rendition, GITMO, etc etc, This could be one of the issues that can be challenged in court, if a case is ever allowed in court.
  19. Andy Downs Member

  20. Anonymous Member

    Scientology cases get cited a fair amount because Scientology attorneys are very busy little bees. They don't call it a "highly litigious cult" for nothing.

    Scientology is like welfare for the legal profession.
  21. Anonymous Member

  22. The Wrong Guy Member

    Fox News: Give the NSA whistleblower the death penalty | Examiner.com

    Excerpt:

    While the feelings may vary, one analyst has taken his anger too far. During a broadcast of "Fox and Friends," Fox News analyst Ralph Peters said the death penalty should be on the table for Edwards Snowden.

    “Now you've got this 29-year-old high school dropout whistleblower making foreign policy for our country, our security policy...It’s sad, Brian. We've made treason cool. Betraying your country is kind of a fashion statement. He wants to be the national security Kim Kardashian. He cites Bradley Manning as a hero...I mean, we need to get very, very serious about treason. And oh by the way, for treason, as in the case of Bradley Manning or Edwards Snowden, you bring back the death penalty.”

    www.examiner.com/article/fox-news-give-the-nsa-whistleblower-the-death-penalty
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  23. Boris Korczak Member

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  24. Boris Korczak Member

    We don't need to be admired - we need to be respected. Are we?
    Stay safe.
    BK

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  25. Anonymous Member

    Funny. I thought prior to 2001, Americans were known for losing the Vietnam War, obesity, and their poor educational systems.
  26. Y como hacemos para detener este espionaje?
  27. Anonymous Member

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  28. The Wrong Guy Member

    Julian Assange praises Edward Snowden as a hero | The Guardian

    Whistleblower will go down in history for exposing 'formulation of a mass surveillance state', says WikiLeaks founder

    Last paragraph:

    Assange called on supportive countries to "line up" and offer support to Snowden. "It will be really telling to see which countries really protect human rights, the privacy of the public, asylum rights, or which countries are scared of the United States or are in bed with this surveillance complex."

    www.guardian.co.uk/media/2013/jun/10/julian-assange-praises-edward-snowden
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  29. A.O.T.F Member

  30. Anonymous Member


    http://www.juancole.com/2013/06/corporations-amendment-fundamentalists.html
  31. Anonymous Member

  32. Rockyj Member

    Because of this:
    And this:

    Hypocritical of the GOP to support no back ground checks for gun owners but support the Government collecting your E-mails and phone records when you're not suspected of committing a crime.
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  33. Anonymous Member

    Wouldn't it be funny if the US built this huge infrastructure to monitor everyone's digital life and no bad guys ever got caught using this information?

    I want to hear about all the money going to dodgy off shore banks, all the public officials taking bribes from crooked contractors, all the alternative medicine scams, all the conspiracies and the white collar crime disrupted, thanks to NSA surveillance information.

    I want to see the bang for my tax dollar buck.

    I see Dr. Oz selling homeopathy on TV. That's an Oprah empire scam. Surely anyone with back door access to the Oprah empire financial transactions could figure out why our government hasn't had the will or the ability to shut down this type of thing.

    tl;dr: Another strategy to fight NSA domestic spying: demand to see how the information has helped law enforcement.

    We also need to know how many wild goose chases were launched thanks to indiscriminate monitoring. A fuck ton, I'm guessing. But it's probably going to be easier to get information about the "hits" rather than the "misses."
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  34. The Wrong Guy Member

    Reporter in U.S. surveillance case says more revelations to come

    U.S. reported to be filing charges against leaker Edward Snowden

    The Associated Press

    Greenwald said Tuesday that there will be more "significant revelations" to come from the documents. "We are going to have a lot more significant revelations that have not yet been heard over the next several weeks and months."

    www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2013/06/11/us-surveillance-programs-prism-snowden.html
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  35. DeathHamster Member

    I wouldn't call that decrypting. The program fishes in memory and hibernation files for the keys. (i.e. they aren't breaking the lock, they're looking under the door mat for the spare key.)
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  36. Andy Downs Member

    Yo say
  37. Anonymous Member

    Is the tail wagging the dog?
    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news...rfield-ge/?utm_source=RSS_Feed&utm_medium=RSS
    note: looks like it was a transformer explosion coincidental to the bomb threat at the capital

    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-bomb-threat-lax-austin-20130611,0,3095207.story

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/06/11/princeton-bomb-threat/2411359/
  38. Andy Downs Member

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  39. Anonymous Member

  40. Rockyj Member

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