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Guardian reporter James Ball: Why I felt I had to turn my back on WikiLeaks

Discussion in 'Wikileaks' started by The Wrong Guy, Sep 2, 2011.

  1. The Wrong Guy Member

    Why I felt I had to turn my back on WikiLeaks, by James Ball

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2011/sep/02/why-i-had-to-leave-wikileaks

    The article concludes with:

    • Like Like x 1
  2. Anonymous Member

    wtf this?
    looks like wikileaks is taking its cues from lulzsec
  3. Nice find, OP! Appreciated!
    • Like Like x 1
  4. Perikles Member

    Fits with my experience of 'em. 'Tis a shame.
  5. Anonymous Member

  6. mongrel Member

    Getting people tortured or killed simply isn't cool.
  7. Anonymous Member

    The sloppiness is unforgivable.
  8. Anonymous Member

    They just couldn't keep their cool, they blew it.

    Still at least there are alternatives. The culture of hack/leak will always be here, and that is good.

    It means the powerbrokers and politicians will always have to remember that we run this.
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Smurf Member

    CNN's reporting that the leaks named the nephew of a top Chinese official has having direct involvement in the Google attack. Can someone tell me, where on the Net, I can read these cables that have been made public? I went to the Wikileaks site and it only mentions cables from last April. http://wikileaks.org/
  10. The Wrong Guy Member

  11. Anonymous Member

    Proof that Wikileaks was always a black op.
  12. Smurf Member

  13. Anonymous Member

    Shut the fuck up and get back to WITP
    • Like Like x 1
  14. Anonymous Member

    COINTELPRO operative ^
  15. COINTELPRO operative ^
  16. Anonymous Member

    I have always called Julian Assange "Julian Asshat" and considered him little more than an attention whore in a rumpled suit he looks like he slept in. About the only improvement in his conduct is he appears at least to have his suits dry cleaned from time to time now.

    This leak was apparently due to a complete noob mistake in security. They reused a password to distribute the unredacted documents. That is what The Guardian had and published in a book. Why they felt compelled to publish a bit of trivia that could be of no relevance to anything is beyond me, but they're a newspaper and I don't expect them to be security gurus or know that you just don't do that.

    Julian Assange was a prominent participant in security culture for decades. He knew damn well you don't do that. Despite that, he damn well did it. That's stupid arrogance and fundamental incompetence at what he portrays as his central area of expertise.

    Additionally, WikiLeaks put their credibility on the line and touted as part of their moral justification that they carefully tried to minimize the impact of their activities on innocent third parties and intelligence sources who could be jeopardized by the leaks. They completely threw that moral justification out the window with this reprehensibly irresponsible act. Without that fig leaf, their tiny epeen dangles in the breeze, deflated and impotent.

    I think the organization should dissolve at this point. It has blown its credibility.

    The good people of the organization, and they are there, should work on a decentralized, non-organizational model of doing the same thing, without asshat leaders whose main motivations seem to be leaping in front of any damn TV camera he sees.

    I don't limit my criticism to Julian Asshat, either. Daniel Dumbshit-Berg and Adrian Lame-O the snitch are not my favorite people, either.
  17. Anonymous Member

    You're so edgy, giving people unflattering nicknames.

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