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Julian Assange What's next?

Discussion in 'Wikileaks' started by Anonymous, Jun 8, 2012.

  1. Has he been sold down the fjord by someone or wtf?







    Something's not quite right here.
  2. Thank you for sharing your astute observation.
  3. protect him from ruskis and pollonium?:confused:
  4. The Wrong Guy Member

    Julian Assange has been charged, prosecutors reveal inadvertently in court filing

    By Matt Zapotosky and Devlin Barrett, The Washington Post, November 15, 2018

    Quote:

    WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has been charged under seal, prosecutors inadvertently revealed in a recently unsealed court filing — a development that could significantly advance the probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election and have major implications for those who publish government secrets.

    The disclosure came in a filing in a case unrelated to Assange. Assistant U.S. Attorney Kellen S. Dwyer, urging a judge to keep the matter sealed, wrote that “due to the sophistication of the defendant and the publicity surrounding the case, no other procedure is likely to keep confidential the fact that Assange has been charged.” Later, Dwyer wrote the charges would “need to remain sealed until Assange is arrested.”

    Dwyer is also assigned to the WikiLeaks case. People familiar with the matter said what Dwyer was disclosing was true, but unintentional.

    Joshua Stueve, a spokesman for the U.S. attorney’s office in the Eastern District of Virginia said, “The court filing was made in error. That was not the intended name for this filing.”

    An FBI spokeswoman declined to comment.

    Federal prosecutors in the Eastern District of Virginia have long been investigating Assange and, in the Trump administration, had begun taking a second look at whether to charge members of the WikiLeaks organization for the 2010 leak of diplomatic cables and military documents that the anti-secrecy group published. Investigators also had explored whether WikiLeaks could face criminal liability for the more recent revelation of sensitive CIA cybertools.

    Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III also has explored WikiLeaks’ publication of emails from the Democratic National Committee and the account of Hillary Clinton’s then-campaign chairman, John D. Podesta. Officials have alleged that the emails were hacked by Russian spies and transferred to WikiLeaks.

    Mueller also has been exploring, among other things, communications between the group and associates of President Trump, including political operative Roger Stone and commentator and conspiracy theorist Jerome Corsi.

    In July, Mueller’s office charged 12 Russian military spies with conspiring to hack DNC computers, stealing the organization’s data and publishing the files in an effort to disrupt the election, and referred in an indictment to WikiLeaks, described only as “Organization 1,” as the platform the Russians used to release the stolen emails.

    A spokesman for the special counsel’s office declined to comment.

    It was not immediately clear what charges Assange would face. In the past, prosecutors had contemplated pursuing a case involving conspiracy, theft of government property or violating the Espionage Act. But whether to charge the WikiLeaks founder was hardly a foregone conclusion. In the Obama administration, the Justice Department had concluded that pursuing Assange would be akin to prosecuting a news organization. In the Trump administration, though, then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions had taken a more aggressive stance and vowed to crack down on all government leaks.

    Barry J. Pollack, one of Assange’s attorneys, said, “The only thing more irresponsible than charging a person for publishing truthful information would be to put in a public filing information that clearly was not intended for the public and without any notice to Mr. Assange. Obviously, I have no idea if he has actually been charged or for what, but the notion that the federal criminal charges could be brought based on the publication of truthful information is an incredibly dangerous precedent to set.”

    The filing in the Eastern District of Virginia came Aug. 22 in a case that combines national security and sex trafficking. Seitu Sulayman Kokayi, 29, was charged with enticing a 15-year-old girl to have sex with him and send him pornographic images of herself. But he was detained in part because he “has a substantial interest in terrorist acts,” according to the court filing.

    His father-in-law, according to the filing, has been convicted of terrorist acts. The case involves previously classified information, according to government filings, and prosecutors plan to use information obtained under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. Kokayi was indicted last week and is set to be arraigned Friday morning.

    The case had been sealed until early September, though by itself it attracted little notice. On Thursday evening, Seamus Hughes, deputy director of the Program on Extremism at George Washington University, who is known for scrubbing court filings, joked about the apparent error on Twitter — which first brought it to the attention of reporters.

    Even if he is charged, Assange’s coming to the United States to face trial is no sure thing. Since June 2012, Assange has been living in the Ecuadoran Embassy in London, afraid that if he steps outside he will be arrested.

    When he first sought asylum in the embassy, he was facing possible extradition to Sweden in a sex crimes case. He has argued that case was a pretext for what he predicted would be his arrest and extradition to the United States.

    In the years since, the Swedish case has been closed, but Assange has said he cannot risk leaving the embassy because the United States would attempt to have him arrested and extradited for disclosures of U.S. government secrets. Throughout that time, the United States has refused to say whether there are any sealed charges against Assange.

    If Assange were to leave the embassy and be arrested by British authorities, he would likely still fight extradition in the British courts.

    Source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/worl...02e6ba-98bd-48df-b447-3e2a4638f05a_story.html
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  5. The Wrong Guy Member

    U.S. prosecutors fight effort to unseal Assange charges | Associated Press

    Quote:

    Federal prosecutors are fighting a request to unseal an apparent criminal complaint against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.

    In papers filed Monday in Alexandria, prosecutors argue that the public has no right to know whether a person has been charged until there has been an arrest. Assange has been staying in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London under a grant of asylum and has long expressed fear of a U.S. prosecution.

    Free-press advocates asked a judge to unseal charges against Assange after prosecutors inadvertently mentioned those charges in an unrelated case.

    Prosecutors acknowledge the mistake in Monday's court filing but refuse to say whether the error is confirmation Assange has actually been charged.

    The Associated Press and other news outlets have reported that Assange is indeed facing unspecified charges under seal.

    Source: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/u-s-prosecutors-fight-effort-unseal-assange-charges-n940236
  6. The Wrong Guy Member

    Journalist Wins WikiLeaks FOIA Appeal Case

    U.K. police will have to disclose documents about WikiLeaks journalists

    By David Gilmour, The Daily Dot, December 18, 2018

    Quote:

    London police will be forced to reveal the existence of communications between U.K. and U.S. law enforcement about WikiLeaks editors after investigative journalist Stefania Maurizi won an important tribunal appeal on Tuesday.

    Maurizi, who works for Italian newspaper La Repubblica and is a media partner for WikiLeaks, has used freedom of information (FOIA) requests for several years to acquire information held by governments and law enforcement about the transparency organization and its founder Julian Assange.

    The journalist brought a challenge against the London police department after its decision to neither confirm or deny shared correspondence in response to one of her FOIA requests.

    Maurizi sought the disclosure of information held about editor-in-chief Kristinn Hrafnsson, current editor Joseph Farrell, and former editor Sarah Harrison.

    On Tuesday, Hrafnsson praised the appeal ruling as an “important first step” and “an important example for journalists in FOIA cases.”

    In legal arguments, the journalist made the case that it was in the public interest whether law enforcement had communicated with U.S. authorities about Farrell and Harrison, in particular, who are British citizens.

    Between 2012 and 2015, the Met spent more than $16 million policing and surveilling the Ecuadorian embassy in London. Assange has resided there, fearing extradition to the U.S.

    In 2014, WikiLeaks staffers learned that a court in Virginia ordered Google to hand over their personal data, emails, contacts and IP addresses, part of a long-running investigation into the organization. Maurizi was digging into the same investigation.

    “We want to know what role the British government and the British police are playing in that process, now that we know that information subpoenaed from these British journalists and editors likely contributed to the criminal investigation in the U.S. and the indictment of Julian Assange,” Maurizi’s lawyer Jennifer Robinson said in November.

    After the victory on Tuesday, the police have until Jan. 14 to hand over the relevant records.

    Source: https://www.dailydot.com/layer8/wikileaks-foia-london-police/
  7. The Wrong Guy Member

    German lawmakers meet Julian Assange in London | Germany | Deutsche Welle

    Two German parliamentarians have become Julian Assange's first visitors in the Ecuadorean Embassy in London since March. The Left party members say the WikiLeaks founder must be protected from extradition to the US.

    Quote:

    Two members of the German parliament, the Bundestag, visited Julian Assange in the Ecuadorean Embassy in London on Thursday to pass on their "greetings of solidarity from the [opposition] Left party and his many supporters from Germany," and to discuss the possibility of a "humanitarian solution" to the WikiLeaks founder's legal situation.

    Sevim Dagdelen and Heike Hänsel, who also sit on the Bundestag's foreign affairs committee, traveled to London as Ecuador increases the pressure to end Assange's six-year stay in the embassy.

    "He was really happy to see us, he hugged us tightly when we left," Dagdelen told DW after the hourlong meeting, which she said was his first visit from parliamentarians in at least eight months. "It was obvious that he was happy about our visit."

    Distrust and uncertainty

    Assange is currently suing the Ecuadorean authorities to improve these conditions. "This is all evidence that his life is being made difficult in his asylum," she said. "Nowhere in the western world is there a journalist who has been detained like this. I have never seen a case of someone with asylum being forbidden from expressing their opinions. This is not acceptable under international law. So I think Europe must act in this situation."

    Though Assange was granted Ecuadorean citizenship in December 2017, his relations with the government are often fraught. His internet access was temporarily cut off in 2016 because WikiLeaks had released documents "impacting on the US election campaign."

    These were believed to include the transcripts of speeches presidential candidate Hillary Clinton made to Goldman Sachs as well as personal emails by Clinton's campaign chairman John Podesta.

    Continued at https://www.dw.com/en/german-lawmakers-meet-julian-assange-in-london/a-46817899

    WikiLeaks' Official and Legal Team's Twitter Accounts are Locked | The Daily Dot

    Quote:

    Several official Twitter accounts affiliated with WikiLeaks, its legal teams, and its public relations efforts were reported frozen and suddenly inaccessible on Thursday by the transparency organization’s editor-in-chief Kristinn Hrafnsson.

    Hrafnsson flagged the situation publicly via his own Twitter account, explaining that the accounts “cannot be accessed and new tweets posted.”

    WikiLeaks and @AssangeDefence twitter accounts down for more then 24 hrs now. No explanations from the company. We need some answers @jack, @kcoleman, @MikeConvertino
    — Kristinn Hrafnsson (@khrafnsson) December 20, 2018

    These accounts are locked @wikileaks @assangedefence @wltaskforce @assangelegal and cannot be accessed. They also seem to have been shadow banned. Should we be worried in these critical times?
    — Kristinn Hrafnsson (@khrafnsson) December 20, 2018

    In addition to being locked out, both @wikileaks and @wltaskforce were failing to appear in the platform’s ‘search all’ drop-down results.

    Continued at https://www.dailydot.com/layer8/wikileaks-official-twitter-accounts-frozen/
  8. DeathHamster Member

    WikiLeaks Leaks!
    • Like Like x 1

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