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Landmeier vs Narconon of Oklahoma Production of Records

Discussion in 'Narconon' started by Anonymous, Dec 3, 2013.

  1. Anonymous Member

    Judge Bland;

    This transmission is being sent to you regarding the Landmeier vs. Narconon of Oklahoma Civil Case.

    The Defendants will be objecting to the Student, Trainee, or Employee records that have been selected for production in your Court on Dec. 3rd.

    The Students, Trainees or Employees are not being notified that any Records being produced have a Protective Order applied to them.

    The individuals that have been selected are basically being encouraged to object to their Records being produced in your Court.

    The Board of Directors of Narconon of Oklahoma, Inc., have retained McAlester attorney Jeffrey H. Contreras to file these objections in your Court.

    Mr. Contreras has represented a few Narconon Arrowhead Staff Members in the past. After reviewing his criminal record, it is my belief Mr. Contreras has either attended the NN AH program or is a graduate.

    Also, Mr. Contreras stood in as representation for Erica Catton during her Divorce Proceedings with Lucas Catton, former Narconon Arrowhead President.

    I am sending this to you in order to preempt a waste of the Court’s time. The Defendants are seeking to delay these proceedings in any way that they can, as they have for the past few years.

    The recipient of the attached letters wishes to remain anonymous unless asked to come forward by the Court with the originals as received.

    ~ Anonymous

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  2. Random guy Member

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  3. Anonymous Member

    Court orders Narconon Arrowhead patients to produce records in lawsuit

    By Jeanne LeFlore Staff Writer'

    McALESTER — A list of clients and their records in connection with a Narconon Arrowhead lawsuit must be handed over to the court in January, court records state.

    Associate District Court Judge Bland made the ruling on Dec. 2 during a hearing in a lawsuit filed on behalf of Heather Landmeier a Narconon graduate who has been in a vegetative state since she overdosed on heroin and oxycontin.

    Narconon Arrowhead is a drug rehabilitation facility in Canadian that uses Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard’s teachings.

    It’s also where three clients, Hillary Holten,21, Gabriel Graves,33, and Stacy Murphy, 20 were found dead within a nine-month span.

    A fourth, Kaycie Weirnick died in 2009 at local hospital.

    The most recent July 2012 death of Murphy spurred an multi-agency investigation, which is still ongoing according to District 18 District Attorney Farley Ward.

    Meanwhile, according to the most recent ruling, Attorney Jeff Contreras must provide the court and Narconon a list of his clients.

    “Records requested ...will be produced,” according to court documents.

    Contreras said he is representing “respondents” in the case.

    The respondents are former Narconon Arrowhead students trainees or employees who were selected to produce documents related to alleged incidents of drug and alcohol use by its staff, trainees and students, according to Contreras.

    The hearing is the most recent in series of lawsuits, filed against Narconon Arrowhead alleging wrongful death, credit card and insurance fraud and employees trading drugs for sex, according to court documents.

    Also earlier this year the Senate passed Senate Bill 295, Stacy’s Law,” to regulate facilities such as Narconon Arrowhead.

    And, Narconon Arrowhead’s top executive Gary Smith and several of his employees had their counseling certification revoked by the National Association of Forensic Counselors.

    In August Narconon Arrowhead’s medical detox facility in McAlester lost its state certification after a temporary permit expired.

    Meanwhile during this months hearing in the Landmeier case, Judge Bland ruled that Narconon attorneys will have to produce records of alleged incidents of employees, trainees and students using illegal drugs and alcohol from 2004 until 2010 for a hearing set for Jan. 7.

    The rulings are part of pre-trial proceedings in the Landmeier lawsuit originally filed in March 2010.

    The suit alleges drugs were given to her by Narconon staff while she was in the program.

    After graduating from the program, Landmeier relapsed, was readmitted and then kicked out two different times for allegedly violating rules by using drugs and alcohol, according to allegations

    The suit alleges those violations occurred after drugs were provided to her by Narconon staff.

    The suit alleges that the day after she was removed for the last time, she overdosed in a Tulsa motel room, leaving her in a permanent vegetative state, paralyzed from the neck down.

    The lawsuit seeks more than $75,000 and alleges breach of duty of care.

    Officials at Narconon Arrowhead have stated they can’t comment on the case, but said drugs and alcohol are “strictly prohibited” at the facility.

    [Gary Smith's letter at the link...]

    The next hearing in the Landmeier case is set for Jan. 7 at 10:30 a.m.

    Contact Jeanne LeFlore at jleflore@mcalesternews.com.

    http://www.mcalesternews.com/local/...oduce-records-in-lawsuit#sthash.qLW8G3dy.dpuf
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  4. BigBeard Member

    Guess the judge didn't like narCONon's lawyers playing games with possible witnesses or litigents very much.

    BigBeard
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  5. jensting Member

    Cool story, bro...
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  6. DeathHamster Member

    This is true. Simply giving drugs or alcohol would be out-exchange.
    • Like Like x 2
  7. Anonymous Member

    January 7, 2014
    Attorney in Narconon Arrowhead lawsuit calls ruling a "Big Win"
    By Jeanne LeFlore Staff Writer
    McALESTER — A judge ruled Tuesday that hundreds of records of Narconon Arrowhead clients, trainees and employees related to incidents of drug or alcohol must be released in connection with an ongoing lawsuit.

    “Its a big win for the family and for the state of Oklahoma,” said attorney Donald Smollen.

    Tuesday’s ruling in the Pittsburg County courtroom of Associate District Judge James Bland followed another ruling made in December stating that attorney Jeff Contreras must provide the court and Narconon a list of his clients.

    Contreras told the News-Capital that he is representing “respondents” in the case.

    The respondents are former Narconon Arrowhead students, trainees or employees who were selected to produce documents related to alleged incidents of drug and alcohol use by its staff, trainees and students, according to Contreras.

    Contreras said he had no comment about Tuesday’s ruling as he walked out of the courtroom after the ruling was made.

    The ruling in the most recent in series of lawsuits filed against Narconon Arrowhead and Narconon International alleging wrongful death, credit card and insurance fraud and employees trading drugs for sex, according to court documents.

    Landmeier remains permanently disabled and requires 24-hour care with lifetime medical costs estimated at more than $30 million, according to Smollen.

    “But this isn’t about the money. This is about putting an end to what goes on at the facility,” the attorney said.

    “Families members like the Landmeiers give Narconon Arrowhead $40,000 to $50,000 to help their children.

    “They don’t expect their children to come out permanently disabled or worse.”

    Smollen said the judge in the case meticulously reviewed several hundred records regarding sexual misconduct and drug use at the Narconon Arrowhead facility.

    “It was a tedious process,” he said.

    Of the hundreds of cases, there were 19 objections filed from respondents who did not wish to have their names disclosed, Smollen said.

    “(Narconon Arrowhead) has really tried hard to prevent the public from knowing what’s going on inside their facility,” Smollen.

    Tuesday’s ruling follows a string of actions involving the Narconon facility.

    Last year, the Senate passed Senate Bill 295, nicknamed “Stacy’s Law” after Stacy Murphy, to regulate facilities such as Narconon Arrowhead.

    And, Narconon Arrowhead’s top executive Gary Smith and several of his employees had their counseling certification revoked by the National Association of Forensic Counselors.

    Then last year, Narconon Arrowhead’s medical detox facility in McAlester lost its state certification after a temporary permit expired.

    Meanwhile, Tuesday’s ruling was part of pre-trial proceedings in the Landmeier lawsuit originally filed in March 2010. The suit alleges drugs were given to her by Narconon staff while she was in the program.

    - See more at: http://www.mcalesternews.com/local/...it-call-ruling-a-Big-Win#sthash.5kLL0N7u.dpuf
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  8. Random guy Member

    Ah, the merchants of chaos at their best, again!
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