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Operation: Data Protection Shield

Discussion in 'Projects' started by Anonyunderpants, May 12, 2008.

  1. taurelilomea Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    I wish there was something like this in the States. :-/
  2. Ehm Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    Hi Ho, Hi Ho, We're off to the ICO!
  3. anon.il Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    ICO LAZOR IS FULLY CHARGED

    Don't answer them anymore, they'll just keep trying to come up with excuses that claim you're doing it wrong. You have them exactly where you want them and they're squirming. Time to stop playing games and FIRE THAT LAZOR!
  4. Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    Thanks for the advice guys. I am going to go straight to the ICO and I've been writing a full letter to them over the past few days - does take a while to pull all of this together, summarise and cite sources though so I'm still working on it.

    Thanks Anonymouse, the draft I posted was written well after I had calmed down a little. You do not want to see the original I wrote :)

    I have looked into this a little bit for the US side and I've found that them getting your information and using it from your license plates is quite possibly illegal. Unfortunately, it's up to you to sue them rather than letting a government body take over.
  5. danaBanana Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    I'm sorry, but I'm pretty sure the ICO doesn't care about Fair Game and all the other crimes of Scientology.

    The issue here is a violation of the Data Protection Act and nothing else - your reasons for wanting the processing to stop seem immaterial. If the ICO asks you why, feel free to elaborate, but don't do it just yet.
  6. unidentified Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    It's necessary to tell the ICO why you want them to stop processing the data - that's why Fair Gaming is being mentioned.
  7. taurelilomea Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    <sarcasm>Yeeeeeaaaah, that'll work. Suing the CoS is a great idea!</sarcasm>
    Ah well, we'll just have to wait for them to wither a bit. :)
  8. Silent Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    All the ICO needs to know is that personal information is being unlawfully processed.
    You need to make this plausible to them, and they will then have to investigate.
  9. Minitrue Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    Awwww, this sucks.:frustration: It would have been a great for the US if we had the equivalent of the DPA. I think we all know how it would end up if some anon in the US tried to sue CoS...
    Anyone know if Canada has something like the DPA?
  10. taurelilomea Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    Anonymous delivers.
    Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act
    Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Home Page - Privacy Commissioner of Canada
    Legalfags should check this out moar thoroughly than I have, but as far as I know PIPEDA and the DPA are virtually identical. You even have a li'l agency to report stuff to!
    I speak for all Amerifags when I say that we are thoroughly jealous of your badass legal system. :)
    Also, somebody should ask Gregg Hagglund (WBM of teh North) if he's thought of this.
  11. Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    Yeah, just go straight to the ICO with this.

    It's fairly obvious that they're just going to string you along, and then probably say they haven't got anything.

    You don't need a huge letter for the ICO, just one that states what has happened and your complaint with the way it's being dealt with. If they ask for anything else then give it to them, but don't jump the gun and make yourself look tinfoil.
  12. auchraw Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    I believe, but check it, that there is nothing against any organisation holding personal information on paper. The Data Protection Act applies only to personal information held on a computer.
  13. danaBanana Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    Why don't you check it?
  14. Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    Not true. It applies to any organised information storage system. Which means that even if it's paper files, in a filing cabinet, it applies. Or even paperwork sorted into alphabetical order.

    Basically, if they're storing information on you, the only way the act doesn't apply is if they're keeping that information in a big pile of paper that's left lying scrunched up on the floor.
  15. argh Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    Actually..

    I think it may even apply then, because then they have information about you that isn't kept securely.
  16. lol9000 Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield


    I had to cover the DPA for my Computing A-level. You are breaching the act any personal data is not held securely. Also, yes, paper records DO count. So, if it was a heap of paper in a safe, they might be Ok. But I doubt it is.
  17. Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    <puts on ArchivistHat> That was true of the original DPA. It was amended in (I think) the late 1990's or early 2000's. It now applies to any information, in any form. And having a shit filing/RM system is no excuse -- if it's all in piles on the floor, you get shat on. <removes ArchivistHat, goes back to reading about PIRATES!>
  18. Theta Omega Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    We've gone over this five times now: the DPA as amended in 1998 covers all forms of personally identifying information- videotape, computer records, audio cassette, charts, voicemail, email, photographic films, typewritten paper, handwritten notebooks, anything that is handled according to any form of systematic processing.

    We all know that the scilons use "the Tech" for everything, and the Green Volume is a systematic basis for the handling of information in an organization- so any personally identifying information they handle, even if it is not stored in any sorted or organized form, is covered.
  19. Athenanon Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    FUCK YEAH! Thanks. I thought I had heard of this before, but I didn't know the details.

    I'm going to look into this moar thoroughly, as suggested. Will report back.

    EDIT: It actually is, as you said, pretty much exactly the same. The only difference I can find is that when an organization gets a request for the information, they have 30 days to comply, while with the DPA the organization has 21 days to comply or state their purposes for having the information.
    We have the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada which is like the ICO, who will, if necessary will take the case to Federal courts. However, this is a last resort. As I understand it, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada only makes "recommendations" to the org, and they do not techinally have to comply.
  20. taurelilomea Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    Northfags - do it anyway. If they've ignored the recommendations case after case after case, it should be taken to the courts.
  21. Athenanon Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    It is recommended to the organization, and true, if the recommendation is ignored, this can be taken a level up to the federal courts, but this is usually reserved for last resorts.
    I'm not going to do this personally, (for my own reasons I'm not going to mention), but I would say go for it if you've been outed and have serious guts.
    I don't see how it would be different from this guy's case w/ the DPA.
    Alright, no moar about Canadian law on this thread from me, its kinda off topic...
  22. taurelilomea Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    Disagreed. I think that the OP should change the first post to reflect the new Canada info.
  23. Athenanon Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    If the OP wants to do that, fine, and then I'd be more than willing to give any help I can to the northfags, but now the subject is on the DPA, so I wanna stay on topic.
    I personally would suggest a new thread for anything concerning the the PIPEDA, and keep this thread just for DPA.
  24. Theta Omega Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    This proves that the CoS has a Data Protection Act obligation to release information they have gathered, since it describes an organized system for filing and managing information, and a system for making decisions based on that information.

    In other words, they're fucked.
  25. Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    I've been lurking a lot for a few days and not actually doing much to be honest - a few birthdays and such so I haven't gotton round to filing my complaint yet. The PIPEDA stuff sounds brilliant - if someone wants to write a summary & guide then I'll definitely add it to the OP.
  26. Athenanon Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    Ehhh.. I'll see what I can do, though my schedule is pretty packed now. :text:
  27. Cachapoal Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    As an ex-sci student auditor I had access to pc files. My daughter was at one point ethics officer and had access to ethics files.
    There is also a large amount of files kept on people who have at one point or another bought a book. Their names and addresses and letters to and fro are kept there for eternity and are written to regularly.

    I want help writing a letter requesting my pc folder/s and ethic files, plus any other information they might have on me or about me.
  28. Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    Hi Cachapoal. First things, what country are you in? If you're in the UK then the first post has a guide on how to get a copy of your folders. The process should be the same/similar for every EU state. It looks like Canada has similar laws but I've not read up on them and Athenanon should be writing a sumarry & guide for them.

    Unfortunately, they played hardball and have been deliberately obstructive in releasing the information. This is against the DPA and I keep reminding myself to make the complaint to the information commissioner. From then, the ICO has up to 31 days to resolve the situation. (edit: sorry, they don't have any timescales for resolving - they will just resolve it as quick as they can) As you're an ex and they definitely have information on you, you're the perfect candidate for the job - it's just getting them to follow the law that's the problem.

    Another unfortunately is that by doing this you can and probably will make you a target. Since doing this, I've had a few strange phone calls and my spam mail has at least doubled. Nothing too drastic yet, but they may be waiting to see what blows over from this. Luckily, part of your rights is to order them to cease processing of information. Again, they denied the order (without giving an adequete reason - again a breach of DPA) so I'm looking to appeal it through the ICO and then through small claims court.
  29. Cachapoal Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    I'm in the USA now, but worked in the UK.

    I very much doubt that they will release any data held and think that the whole point of this action is to show the authorities that the CofS is breaking the law on several fronts. So following up with ICO is the key step.
  30. Silent Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    Just if there was any doubt: You do not have to reside in the UK (in Cachapoals example) to use the ICO, as long as the personal info is in UK that is enough.
  31. Athenanon Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    FPIPEDA Information and Resources for Canadians
    My interpretation: Apparently if you are Canadian, living in Canada, you still may be able to get info from the US Scientology orgs about yourself. However, the US has the Patriot Act, which allows certain officials to look through various information data bases. This conflicts with PIPEDA.
    There is a bit of a dichotomy of law between Patriot Act and the PIPEDA, but with some amount of difficulty, this could work.

    I am by no means a legal fag, and this is something a serious legal fag would have to look into. I'm just going to look into the Canadians looking to use the PIPEDA in accordance with organizations in Canada.
  32. ScudMuffin Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    OK peeps, time to man the harpoons if you ask me, and if you have the ability to do so regarding the DPA.
  33. asagai Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    Watching Stu's Plymouth videos from the 3rd June, I noticed the woman who said her friend was constantly written to and phoned several times a week and I suddenly realised anyone whose name/address/phone number is in CF (Central Files) can also make a challenge under the DPA!

    The data satisfies the criteria of the DPA. It is personal data and these days CF is computerised and so is in a relevant file retrieval system.

    Therefore anybody who is regularly or constantly phoned or written to by the org can use the DPA to ask the org to stop processing their data and to let them have a copy of all info held on them.

    This means there are hundreds of thousands of inactive Scios or people in the UK who have never done anything else than buy a book, who can use the DPA!

    If the Org has transferred the data up to a higher org or overseas, then they can also challenge over the security of the data.

    Spread the word to anyone who is hassled by letters and phone calls and let's get the orgs tied up with DPA challenges.

    The CofS will almost certainly refuse to stop processing or render copies of the data and every time they do this is another DPA infringement to report to the Information Commissioners Office.

    This is probably the simplest and purest way for us to challenge the CofS and the ICO will get very interested in the way they are handling personal data!

    Anons could even buy a book and then make a challenge when the CofS deluges them with promo, letters, etc.

    PM me if you want info on how to challenge the CofS over this.
  34. vegnej Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    Just a general point probably been mentioned earlier in the thread, how far can you go back and of course do you need proof of purchase, dam i threw mine away !!!!!!!!!
  35. asagai Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    No proof of purchase needed. Doesn't matter when you got put on their files.

    If they are sending you mail/promo or phoning you recently, they are processing your data and therefore you can use the DPA to get them to stop.

    PM me if you need instructions of what to do.
  36. ScudMuffin Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    All you need is belief they have your info.

    USE YOUR BELIEF!

    [IMG]
  37. Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    Right, complaint filed with the ICO.
  38. Cudgel Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    Update on any action, please.
  39. Silent Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    TL;DR: Some harpoons have been fired, MANY MORE SHOULD/COULD BE FIRED!

    You can fire your harpoon if:
    1. You don't mind revealing your identity
    2. You believe that Scifags have personally identifiable info on you(any kind of docs, images and video is also included).
    3. Said info is stored in an EU-country.

    If you can say yes to 1-3 THEN FIRE YOUR FUCKING HARPOONS! (file a complaint with your local administrative organ dealing with the Data Protection laws in your country, they will have to take it from there.)
  40. vegnej Member

    Re: Operation: Data Protection Shield

    I keep getting crap from flag in Florida, now they do have a have you moved section on the mail. I emailed them to take me off and i think it's worked. Can i still require them to remove my details if there not in the UK???

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