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The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community and the Church of Scientology

Discussion in 'News and Current Events' started by COS and NOI News, Mar 18, 2021.

  1. The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community and the Church of Scientology.

    There has long been a relationship, if not an alliance, between the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community and the Church of Scientology. Representatives of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community regularly appear at events held by Scientology front-groups United For Human Rights and Youth For Human Rights. In turn, representatives of the Church of Scientology regularly appear at events sponsored by the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community.

    A recent example: A representative of the Church of Scientology appeared at the ladies only event "Responsibilities of the Faithful During & After a Pandemic" held by the Greater Toronto Area East chapter of Ahmadiyya Muslim Youth Association Canada:

    https://twitter.com/AMYA_GTAEast/status/1370492044997705730
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    In 2017, the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community joined a letter in support on Scientology in Russia:

    Screenshot_20210318-132850_1616100562713.png

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    Screenshot_20210318-132830_1616100501920.png

    Two characteristics of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community are relevant to this discussion.

    First, the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community has absolutely no relationship, and absolutely nothing to do, with the Nation of Islam. Not only is there no present day relationship between the two, but their origins, doctrines and theology are completely separate and distinct.

    Second, the relationship between the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community and mainstream (i.e., Sunni, Shiite) Islam is similar to the relationship between the Mormon church and mainstream (e.g., Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Episcopalian, Protestant) Christians.

    Mormons consider themselves to be Christians; many (if not most) mainstream Christians do not consider Mormons to be Christians.

    Similarly, members of Ahmadiyya Muslim Community consider themselves to be Muslims; in my experience, mainstream (i.e., Sunni, Shiite) Muslims do not consider members of Ahmadiyya Muslim Community to really be Muslims.

    The reasons for this are fundamentally the same in both situations.

    A foundational belief of mainstream Christianity is that Jesus was the last prophet. and there can be no revelation after his death. Yet, Mormons believe in multiple prophets after Jesus, including to the present day. The result has been increasingly divergent theologies.

    Similarly, a foundational belief of mainstream (i.e., Sunni, Shiite) Islam is that Muhammad was the "Seal of the Prophets," and there can be no revelation after his death. Yet, Ahmadiyya Muslims believe that Muhammad was followed by their founder, Mirza Ghulam Ahmad, who claimed to have been divinely appointed as both the Promised Mahdi (Guided One) and Messiah. The result has again been divergent theologies.

    As a consequence, the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community craves acceptance, recognition, and validation -- which they receive from the Church of Scientology. I have seen members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community appear at United / Youth for Human Rights events where they were misperceived as being representative of Islam generally. (To be fair, they always made every effort to accurately describe their beliefs; it was the Scientologists who didn't pay attention, didn't know the difference, or didn't care.)

    The Church of Scientology has long been expert in forming alliances with other fringe groups (and I don't mean that phrase disparagingly) that feel a need for acceptance, recognition, and validation. The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community is one such group.

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