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The antivaxers have gone full retard

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by The Internet, Dec 7, 2015.

  1. anon8109 Member

    http://time.com/3208886/whistleblower-claims-cdc-covered-up-data-showing-vaccine-autism-link/

    Time magazine posted this in Aug 2014

    Whistleblower Claims CDC Covered Up Data Showing Vaccine-Autism Link


    William Thompson, a senior scientist at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and one of the authors of a 2004 study published in the journal Pediatrics, spoke with Brain Hooker, who serves on the board of Focus Autism (which was founded to “put an end to the needless harm of children by vaccination and other environmental factors”), about the data that was not included in the final report. The study looked at both healthy children and those with autism, to see if there were any differences in their rates of being vaccinated against measles, mumps and rubella (MMR), and found none. That suggested that childhood immunizations likely were not contributing to an increased risk of autism. Hooker and Thompson, however, discussed a subset of the 624 children with autism and 1824 without the condition who were studied and Thompson admitted that among African-American boys, the incidence of autism was higher among those who were vaccinated than among those who weren’t. But that information was not part of the paper. Thompson claims he was not aware that the discussion was being recorded, and his statements appeared in a video released on YouTube on August 22 entitled “CDC Whistleblower Revealed.”

    [...]

    In a statement issued through his attorneys, Thompson says “Reasonable scientists can and do differ in their interpretation of information.” He calls for transparency in the data collecting and reporting process, but says that the way that the 2004 study was presented does not negate the importance of vaccination. “I want to be absolutely clear that I believe vaccines have saved and continue to save countless lives. I would never suggest that any parent avoid vaccinating children of any race. Vaccines prevent serious diseases, and the risks associated with their administration are vastly outweighed by their individual and societal benefits.”
  2. DeathHamster Member

    • Like Like x 2
  3. anon8109 Member

  4. DeathHamster Member

    https://bbs.boingboing.net/t/12-yea...ng-video-about-anti-vaxxers-gets-doxxed/79983
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  5. TrevAnon Member

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  6. How Scientology members Inflame the Vaccine Wars.

    Hollywood Reporter: How Hollywood Stars, Trump and Scientologists Inflame the Vaccine Wars: "It's Spurious but Effective"

    http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/fe...continues-despite-scientific-consensus-924080

    * * * * * BEGIN EXCERPT * * * * *

    How Hollywood Stars, Trump and Scientologists Inflame the Vaccine Wars: "It's Spurious but Effective"

    by Gary Baum August 31, 2016, 3:31pm PDT

    [SNIP]

    How Hollywood Stars, Trump and Scientologists Inflame the Vaccine Wars: "It's Spurious but Effective"

    by Gary Baum August 31, 2016, 3:31pm PDT

    [SNIP]

    A notable number of the highest-profile immunization dissenters are Scientologists, from Masterson and Juliette Lewis to Jenna Elfman and Kirstie Alley. In a statement to THR, the Church of Scientology, which has a troubled public relationship with many established mental health treatments, insists it “takes no position one way or the other on this issue.” (Tabloid stories were written after the death of church member John Travolta’s 16-year-old son Jett, who was said to have been improperly treated for autism.) Yet Scientology did host a June 2015 event at one of its Los Angeles community centers where issue activists Robert F. Kennedy Jr. and biochemist Brian Hooker, Ph.D., promulgated their views ahead of California Gov. Brown’s signing of SB 277 weeks later.

    Ex-Scientologist critics observe that a mistrust of immunization, while not official doctrine, is an unsurprising consequence of members’ credence for the principles surrounding the church’s controversial cleansing “purification rundown” program, which allegedly treats drug abuse and toxic exposure. “In that school of thought, vaccines could potentially be hurtful too,” says Claire Headley. In addition, they note, members find familiarity and even righteousness in the experience of holding lonely, lambasted views. “Smugness is an understatement,” says Spanky Taylor. “It’s an arrogance.”

    * * * * * END EXCERPT * * * * *
  7. Scientology’s anti-vaxxer celebrities are responsible for making America sick: report.

    Raw Story: Scientology’s anti-vaxxer celebrities are responsible for making America sick: report.

    https://www.rawstory.com/2016/08/sc...e-responsible-for-making-america-sick-report/

    * * * * * BEGIN EXCERPT * * * * *

    But many celebrity skeptics share something else in common with one another: Scientology.

    The Hollywood Reporter found a noteworthy number of the highest-profile vaccine skeptics are Scientologists — including Danny Masterson, Juliette Lewis, Jenna Elfman and Kirstie Alley.

    Another prominent vaccine skeptic, Jenny McCarthy, is rumored to be involved in Scientology, which she began exploring while dating Jim Carrey — another skeptic.

    The Church of Scientology takes no official position on immunization, and practitioners do take prescribed medication and seek medical advice from doctors.

    But the organization promotes a controversial “purification rundown” cleansing program, which Scientologists use to treat drug abuse and toxic exposure.

    Some former Scientologists say could seed mistrust in vaccinations, because vaccines could also be seen as “potentially hurtful,” said ex-Scientologist Claire Headley.

    The organization also hosted an anti-vaxx event at one of its Los Angeles community centers featuring Robert F. Kennedy Jr., who believes in a link between vaccines and autism, and biochemist Brian Hooker, another immunization skeptic.

    * * * * * END EXCERPT * * * * *
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  8. DeathHamster Member

    https://www.thestar.com/news/queens...told-students-vaccines-can-lead-to-death.html
    Face-palm at a science teacher falling for the "both sides" fallacy. (Yes, when backed by carefully checked evidence, you pillock!) And yes, you are a fucking anti-vaxxer!

    The anti-vaxxers are as bad as the "not a Scientologst but.." types.
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  9. DeathHamster Member

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/mumps-1.3996880
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  10. ^In the US, I do believe there is evidence of a more deadly strain, which is so contagious it can even spread via social media such as Twitter.

    It's known as Trash-mumps, or just Trumps. It is extremely uncomfortable and the effects can linger on for months - even years.
    • Like Like x 3
  11. Disambiguation Global Moderator

    This is great! Hopefully he'll Meet his Maker soon with oozing sores. Sorry for the kids tho.

    Poor-children-please-help.276185045_std.jpg
  12. The Wrong Guy Member

    Russian Trolls Promoted Anti-Vaccination Propaganda That May Have Caused Measles Outbreak, Researcher Claims

    By Cristina Maza, Newsweek, February 14, 2019

    Quote:

    Russian propaganda may be responsible for the persistence of measles as conspiracy theories about vaccinations spread across the Internet, according to researchers.

    The same Russian trolls who attempted to provoke racial tensions and influence the outcome of the 2016 presidential election were also responsible for spreading propaganda against vaccinations. Their efforts may have helped cause the measles outbreak that infected tens of thousands and killed dozens in Europe last year, researchers told Radio Free Europe.

    A 2018 report by the American Public Health Association, titled "Weaponized Health Communication: Twitter Bots and Russian Trolls Amplify the Vaccine Debate," came to a similar conclusion.

    “Whereas bots that spread malware and unsolicited content disseminated antivaccine messages, Russian trolls promoted discord. Accounts masquerading as legitimate users create false equivalency, eroding public consensus on vaccination,” the report said.

    Continued at https://www.newsweek.com/russian-tr...ccination-propaganda-measles-outbreak-1332016

    Measles Outbreak: How Dangerous Anti-vax Lies Are Spreading Online | Newsweek

    https://www.newsweek.com/measles-outbreak-how-dangerous-anti-vax-lies-spread-online-1331269
  13. DeathHamster Member

    Fuuuuck!
    I'd be curious to see where that donor money is coming from.
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  14. DeathHamster Member

    ChristAsshole.jpg
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  15. Disambiguation Global Moderator

    In aggregate, the CDC is estimating the current flu season’s impact through February 23, 2019, as follows:

    20,400,000 – 23,600,000 symptomatic illnesses
    9,500,000 – 11,100,000 medical visits
    252,000 – 302,000 hospitalizations
    16,400 - 26,700 flu-related deaths
  16. DeathHamster Member

    2vam0p.jpg
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  17. Disambiguation Global Moderator

    https://www.cdc.gov/measles/cases-outbreaks.html
    There have been 140 cases of measles in Rockland County NY
    There have been 70 in a small county in the Pacific Northwest. These outbreaks can be virulent.
    The last few years the outbreaks are brought from outside the US into unvaccinated groups.. Amish, Somali refugees, Orthodox Jews. The disease has been imported from France, Israel, and Manila and elsewhere.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/m...anti-vaccine-misinformation-campaigns-n979591
    Unvaccinated teen gets vaccinated in spite of mom’s beliefs

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  18. New York Times: Despite Measles Warnings, Anti-Vaccine Rally Draws Hundreds of Ultra-Orthodox Jews

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/14/nyregion/measles-vaccine-orthodox-jews.html

    By Kimiko de Freytas-Tamura

    May 14, 2019

    * * * * * BEGIN EXCERPT * * * * *

    But the rally on Monday in Monsey, a Rockland County town about 30 miles northwest of New York City, vividly illustrated how the anti-vaccine fervor is not only enduring, but may be growing: Hundreds of ultra-Orthodox Jews packed a ballroom for a “vaccine symposium” with leaders of the anti-vaccination movement.

    Organized by a Monsey-based Jewish group, the event also showed how the movement was gaining ground: Greg Mitchell, a Washington-based lobbyist who represents the Church of Scientology, attended the meeting and addressed the crowd, offering to be their “voice in the public-policy game.”


    * * * * * END EXCERPT * * * * *
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