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Would someone from Iran explain

Discussion in 'Iran' started by Eddie, Jun 18, 2009.

  1. Exactly what's going on in Iran. I know that the government is strictly (sunni?)muslim and people don't like it (why?).

    What are the different opinions among people and why do they cause trouble?
    What does it lead to?

    Objective if you can.



    I also know abouts the history of Iran, the cold war and stuff.
  2. Sunni Muslims are the strict Muslims with all the rules. They have made it where the women have to wear the hijab all the time, can't drink or smoke, can't have parties or music. And the Shia's are the liberated/reformed Muslims that aren't against everything, so you can see how they don't like the Sunni's being in control.
  3. There is a French movie called Persepolis that gives you a good idea of what Tehran is like. It's animated, with English subtitles, but you can get an English version. Very amazing movie.

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0808417/
  4. situation in iran

    well i don`t live there, but i was born in iran and left the country with 8, i have family down there and visit the country every 2 3 years. exepct this summer.
    the problem in iran is not the religion, iranian use to be very traditional people, it is how the elite deals with the religion. you have a apparatus of oppression, hardly freedom. the laws are for the people, not for officials, clerics and so on.
    the youth wants it freedom, essiantals the west have, like dress how you like to, do your hair how you like to, loud music in cars, parties and so on.
    this demonstrations show the frustation over the government, it is not just the election fraud, but its a lump in a throat, which is about to explode
  5. very funny. sorry but you have no idea what you're talking about. Iran's governement is radical shia (the only shia government in the wolrd that I know of) that's one of the reasons behind their lukewarm relations with Arabs who are all Sunnis. neither Sunnis nor Shias are liberated/reformed; they are all extrimists in their own way and they don't agree with each other.in both, he women have to wear the hijab all the time(exept at home), people can't drink(alcohol) or smoke(narcotics), can't have parties(with men and women together) or music(or atlkeast most forms of music)
  6. Sol Mann Member

    lawl @ 'they are all extremists' .... somebody's been watching some Fox!

    First off, every religious sect or denomination has its own diversity. Secondly, if you want to get technical, if everyone in a given area is of an extreme opinion.... then technically, that makes them not extremists. It makes them average.

    You're funny.
  7. new bolster

    As some one mentioned Iran is Shia not Sunni.

    Now lets look at Iran and in a broad sense get an overview of whats going on. First if you look at demographics you will see that about 60% of Iranians are under 30. So they were not part of the 1979 revolution. And as young people around the world do they are interesting in making a life for them selves. They want a good economy with good jobs. They want freedom live their lives without such strict state control. And other things people around the world want.

    And its not just young people that want more freedom and better relations with the west etc. Many older people are also marching. And even more important this time is the more pragmatic politicians religious leaders are also backing the demonstrations.

    It does not take a rocket scientist to see that Iran can tone down its rhetoric and support for radicals in other countries with out loosing its Islamic soul. And if they pull back a little they can have normal economic relations with the rest of the world. The would be a huge boom for the Iranian economy. Just look at China and Iran. And I think Iranians are just as educated and hard working. Just read some history of the persians:)

    Now on the other hand lets be clear that we are not headed to a western style liberal democracy. The majority of the people do not want this. And many do not even want a more pragmatic approach. Remember the election was probably very close. If so that means at least close to half of the people voted for the current hard line government.
  8. Where do the Shia in Iraq come down on the current turmoil in Iran? Is it as simple as supporting Ahmedinijad because of his intelligence background and more certain support for their own issues? Or are they shrewd enough to consider that a regime change in Iran (one widely supported in other key countries) could lead to greater overall influence in Iraq with less western meddling?
  9. cussbunny Member

    If nothing else, Americans who were eligible to vote in 2000 are very familiar with the frustration of a nearly perfectly divided population, vying for control with two very different candidates. That was my first presidential election, I missed 1996 by being three weeks shy of my 18th birthday. The resulting fiasco made me frustrated and angry and fed up with our whole electoral process. And that was a legitimate election - I can only imagine how the Iranian Mousavi supporters feel right now.
  10. and turnoffs

    I don't think the elections were very close AT ALL. Mousavi likely won by a huge margin.

    High turnouts means people who don't normally vote (are against the Islamic regime) have voted. The turnout is usually very low because people believe that voting is supporting the Islamic Republic, having made that mistake with Moein 4 years ago (I also didn't vote then) we made sure to at least vote for the lesser evil this time around. When there's a high turnout the reformist will win 100% of the time because Iranians demand reform. I got a letter from my friend yesterday who lives in Isfahan (a traditional city), I had told him I was upset about the country being divided. He wrote that there is no division at all, it's really just everybody vs. a bunch of basijis.

    The elections were rigged big time. They didn't want to pull another Khatami.
  11. Sorry, I didn't mean to insult anyone. and the extremes I mentioned are more like two poles apart (again not exactly). my point is if anyone wants to follow the exact code in any of them they have to be extremists.

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